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Youth Want Jobs, Not Antiquated Expensive Degrees

Educators of Technical, Technology and STEM education continue with us, to advocate for hands-on skilled training. Thought leaders from around the country have discussed ways to accomplish this through education reform. C. M. Rubin published a discussion with Charles Fadel.

Contemporary education is failing our students because we are stuck in a curriculum designed for a different century, We need to re-examine college entrance requirements (and their tests). They hold change hostage to antiquated and incomplete requirements. Massive adaptation must be demanded by parents and educators alike. Without these changes, we will be unable to adapt curricula to reflect modern needs. It starts with creating a framework for WHAT we need to teach, which must be comprehensive yet concise and actionable


NEW EDITION OF WELDING SKILLS ADDRESSES INDUSTRY CERTIFICATION

American Technical Publishers announces the availability of new welding training materials specifically designed for welders and students working with all types of welding processes and systems. Welding Skills, Fourth Edition, is an effective instructional tool that addresses all aspects of the welding trade and the latest welding technology. In addition, competencies recommended in the American Welding Society (AWS) Schools Excelling through National Skills Standards Education (SENSE) guidelines are included throughout the textbook.


Technology in Action

Economic Facts Everyone Should Know

The following set of facts are called the Ten Pillars of Economic Wisdom. These basic laws of economics were developed by The Economic Foundation of New York. It might be called a guide for human's economic life. These ten rules show how simply the economic truth can be told.


Evaluate Cost

Standard practice has been to:

 

EVALUATE THE COST OF
IMPLEMENTING NEW TECHNOLOGY


Survival as a manufacturing nation demands that we also:


EVALUATE THE COST OF NOT
IMPLEMENTING NEW TECHNOLOGY


Ioannis Miaoulis- NCTL STEM

We Are the TE in STEM


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Article for Review

Communication Simulation, Understanding and Implementation

Visualization and model building are skills that technology instructors have been providing their students for some time. Using visualization and the ability to replicate a model are skills that can be enhanced when students are introduced to communication simulation and the process of developing simulated representations of reality. In this article, the authors explain how to develop and design a communication simulation using a physical security analysis of a computer laboratory as the theme of the activity. Communication simulation from the authors’ viewpoint is the use of technology and visualization to allow the student to communicate by using a model

Computer developed simulations are new teaching tools that faculty are starting to use in their classrooms. In this paper, the authors look at one type of simulation, communication, which can be implemented into the classroom using a physical security analysis from a technology/visualization perspective. However, to disseminate this article to a broader audience and to be consistent with the understanding of the terminology used throughout the narrative several terms will be defined using Wikipedia as the resource. As Clark Aldrich states (2009, p. xxxii), “The lack of common terms is a huge problem, and it has substantially hindered the development of the simulation space. Sponsors, developers, and students have not been able to communicate intelligently.”
Sill Hall 3D Image

Follow The Money

Accountability

Consider managing a grant for several hundreds of thousands of dollars over a period of 24 months whereby the grant outcomes require articulated and cohesive work to be accomplished by a collaborative party of entities. Who is held accountable? The Feds? The local fiduciary whom awarded the grant? Your boss? You? How about your front line staff? What about the local agencies and partners, cohorts and advocates? What components of the grant are clear and what is vague? Is there a contingency plan and systems in place to manage problems and stave off catastrophe?

For a time, common grant language included the phrase, “seamless and transparent services provided to the client”. Ok. But who is really responsible to make sure that happens? Maybe more importantly, who is responsible if the requirements of the grant are not met?
Author: 
Scott Brown

News

Time to Reinforce the Building Blocks of The American Dream

Successful nations, just like successful businesses, are built on three things: people, education and ideas. 

By opening our nation’s doors to people ready to build new lives and abide by the Constitution, the U.S. has become a stronger, more vibrant nation. By investing heavily in public education, the nation transformed both natives and newcomers into literate, numerate Americans ready to contribute to an advanced industrial economy. And by investing in scientific research, the nation combined and advanced new ideas — many from these new Americans — in new ways to build the most productive, prosperous nation the world has even seen.

However, these three pillars of the American dream — people, education and the investment in scientific research that is the wellspring of new ideas, new capabilities and new products — are all endangered.


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The Art of the Future

jim brazell's picture

Accelerate STEM Innovation with FREE Ed Tech Tools

It is generally accepted that one can not design education today to prepare young people and adults for the future because we do not know what the future will be. Today, technology has zoomed past schools, industry, government, consumers and civil society. The modern world needs a new way, or more accurately, an old way of seeing technology. 

The question is not whether we can design for the future; rather, the question is: Can we update antiquated practice more closely aligned to what is emerging today in our own backyards?

 

News

A New U: Faster + Cheaper Alternatives to College

Every year, the cost of a four-year degree goes up, and the value goes down. But for many students, there’s a better answer. 

So many things are getting faster and cheaper. Movies stream into your living room, without ticket or concession-stand costs. The world’s libraries are at your fingertips instantly, and for free. 

So why is a college education the only thing that seems immune to change? Colleges and universities operate much as they did 40 years ago, with one major exception: they’ve gotten dramatically more expensive. And they’ve actually gotten slower, with the average time to graduate now over five years. 

As a result, graduates often struggle with enormous debt burdens. Even worse, they often find that degrees did not prepare them to obtain and succeed at good jobs in growing sectors of the economy. Parents and students have accepted this because a college degree has been seen as a prerequisite to a professional career. But now, for the first time, there are real alternatives. 

A New You

ONE and DONE, Workforce Development at Houston Community College

Houston Community College is pioneering a program to ensure students earn a level one certificate, receive resume writing assistance and get help with job interviews in just one semester.  The “Take One & Done” program is being offered at HCC’s Southeast College Eastside Campus.

“Students come full time and we will provide financial aid, child care from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. if necessary, and they will get a level one certificate in one of seven programs,” says Melissa Gonzalez, president of Southeast College. “We looked specifically at these programs, where there are jobs and there is a demand for workers.”

“Take One and Done” includes level one certificates in:

  1. Welding Technology-Basic Welding Helper
  2. Construction Management Technology
  3. Industrial Electricity Electrical Helper
  4. Business Management-Insurance Specialist/Associate
  5. Logistics & Supply Chain Management - Maritime Logistics & Specialist
  6. Real Estate - Residential
  7. HVAC

Silicon Valley Companies Encouraging Local Student to Aspire for High-Tech Jobs

Internships, contests and engineering coursework give teens from the area’s majority-Latino high schools an entree to STEM careers. 

Most students at the high school, on San Jose’s East Side in the southern end of Silicon Valley, are from Mexican immigrant families. Nearly all will be the first in their families to go to college; some will be the first to complete high school. The kids who grow up in Silicon Valley’s Latino neighborhoods, the children of groundskeepers, janitors, cooks and construction workers, rarely get a shot at high-paying, high-tech jobs. Just 4.7 percent of the Valley’s tech professionals are Latino and 2.2 percent are African-American, according to 2015 data from the American Community Survey. By contrast, 57 percent are foreign-born, with many coming from India and China, a local industry group estimates.

Silicon Valley STEM

FIRST Championship About Way More Than Robotics

It’s about the lessons it teaches its students, the empowerment it creates for its teachers, and the love of learning it fosters among all involved. FIRST Championship is the shining example of everything FIRST values: teamwork within and between teams; learning and on-the-fly problem-solving; “Coopertition®,” which is what we like to call displays of unqualified kindness and respect in the face of fierce competition; and “Gracious Professionalism®,” which encourages high-quality work, emphasizes the value of others, and shows respect for everyone.

FIRST Championship is an incredible experience with many lessons, but there are three that can be applied to every classroom.

1. It’s not about winning—it’s about the journey

Competition is about so much more than who comes out on top. True winning means we’ve inspired a real love of learning in our students, teaching them to solve problems, work collaboratively, and communicate with others. Most important, it teaches them humility and resilience in the face of failure, and the innovation and creativity they need to overcome these obstacles. Our students frequently tell us they leave our program as very different people than when they joined. They transform from timid to confident leaders, from hesitant to adept engineers, and it’s a pleasure for us to watch them grow.


Innovation Lab Program Emerged from International Baccalaureate Authorization

A collective effort by the academic leadership team of the Solomon Schechter Day School of
Bergen County, the development of our Innovation Lab program emerged from our pursuit of
the International Baccalaureate(IB) authorization. As part of that effort, we introduced a design
thinking course in our middle school and hired a part-time design thinking faculty member.
 
Andrew Katz, our Director of Academic Affairs joined the school in mid 2017, bringing with him
experience in design and building innovation labs at two previous independent schools. Once we
created our vision for the program, we were fortunate enough to receive a donation from an
alumni parent, which enabled us to turn our vision into a reality. We then quickly turned our
focus to hiring an experienced director of the lab, and together - along with our science team,
librarian, and educational technology team -  began concentrating on developing a robust
curriculum, designing the space, and focusing on interdisciplinary integration across the school.
 
Our team also visited and initiated relationships with community maker spaces, such as the
Maker Depot in Totowa, N.J., which have offered advice regarding 3D printing and
demonstrated potential tools that will further inspire our design courses.
Solomon Schechter NJ

Dual Mission Education Institutes in Higher Education

As higher education faces declining enrollment numbers, reduced state funding, and accusations that it is elitist and out of reach for many Americans, university presidents, chancellors, and system heads from Wisconsin, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Arkansas, and Utah, discussed new and innovative models of education that are addressing some of higher ed’s greatest challenges and the shortage of skilled workers. The dual education model can help universities save costs by sharing staff, faculty and infrastructure (it is essentially two schools for the price of one) and keep tuition low. It also allows students who start on a community college track to easily transfer their credits if they choose to continue their studies towards an advanced degree, and to do so much more seamlessly than if they were to transfer to a different school. Additionally, its open admissions policy means more underrepresented populations are getting a shot at a degree in higher education. 

The summit was hosted by Utah Governor Gary Herbert, the Utah State Board of Regents and UVU President Matthew Holland

With higher education increasingly in the cross-hairs, the summit provided a lively and timely debate on the future of higher ed and how to provide improved access to quality programs for students across the spectrum of need and opportunity. The following are transcripts from the conversation and links to the video.


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Competitions

Samsungs "Solve for Tomorrow" Program

Samsung Electronics America (SEA) announced the launch of the company’s 6th annual Samsung Solve for Tomorrow (#SamsungSolve) program and the call for entry submissions. Samsung’s flagship citizenship initiative is one of many innovative programs designed to address the growing education gap and career development shortage in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) in the U.S. 

Samsungs "Solve for Tomorrow"

Simple machines

Grade Level: 
Middle School
Subject: 
Science
Provided by TryEngineering -
 
Lesson Synopsis
Students learn the basic principles of simple machines and explore everyday uses.
 
- Simple machines are "simple" because most have only one moving part.
- "Work" is only done when something is moved (displaced) by a force (push or pull).
- Machines do not reduce the amount of work for us, but they can make it easier.
 
Objectives 
- Be able to identify simple machines and their use in daily life.
- Build a simple machine.
- Define work as an object being moved through a distance by a force.
 
Lesson Activities 
Three student handouts are provided for advance review (available at http://www.tryengineering.org/lesson_detail.php?lesson=22):
 
1. Introduction To Simple Machines
2. Types of Simple Machines
3. What is Work? 
 
Four student activities are provided:
 
1. Are These Machines? 
2. Jumping Coin Experiment
3. Make Your Own Inclined Plane
4. You are the Engineer: Problem Solving with Simple Machines
 

Foundations

Boeing Engineers Create STEM Activities to Challenge and Inspire Students

Boeing, Iridescent's Curiosity Machine, PBS Learning Media and the Teaching Channel have produced a collection of educational materials and tutorials that children can use to engineer an airfoil, find alternative energy sources and design their own satellite, among dozens of other activities.

The activities are intended to develop skills such as the ability to think critically, collaborate and communicate effectively. Boeing engineers worked side-by-side with its partners to develop lesson plans, documentaries and hands-on activities that break down complicated concepts into easy-to-digest resources. All materials and tutorials are available to download for free at Boeing's Educational Resources page. http://www.boeing.com/principles/education.page#/edu_resources

Employment