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Youth Want Jobs, Not Antiquated Expensive Degrees

Educators of Technical, Technology and STEM education continue with us, to advocate for hands-on skilled training. Thought leaders from around the country have discussed ways to accomplish this through education reform. C. M. Rubin published a discussion with Charles Fadel.

Contemporary education is failing our students because we are stuck in a curriculum designed for a different century, We need to re-examine college entrance requirements (and their tests). They hold change hostage to antiquated and incomplete requirements. Massive adaptation must be demanded by parents and educators alike. Without these changes, we will be unable to adapt curricula to reflect modern needs. It starts with creating a framework for WHAT we need to teach, which must be comprehensive yet concise and actionable


How 3D Printing in Education Improves Learning

With the advent of affordable 3d printers like the DaVinci 1.0 (costs less than $500 in the USA), we wanted to see how this technology can best benefit education. Studica is always looking for ways to help education customers marry new technologies with their teaching goals, to help create a stronger learning experience for students.


Technology in Action

Economic Facts Everyone Should Know

The following set of facts are called the Ten Pillars of Economic Wisdom. These basic laws of economics were developed by The Economic Foundation of New York. It might be called a guide for human's economic life. These ten rules show how simply the economic truth can be told.


A Brighter Tomorrow

How often we wish for another chance

To make a fresh beginning,

A chance to blot our mistakes

And change failure into winning--

And it does not take a new year

To make a brand-new start,

It only takes the deep desire

To try with all our heart

To live a little better

And to always be forgiving

And to add a little laughter

To the world in which we're living--

So never give up in despair

And think that you are through,

For there's always a tomorrow

And a chance to start anew.

Anonymous


Ioannis Miaoulis- NCTL STEM

We Are the TE in STEM


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Article for Review

Communication Simulation, Understanding and Implementation

Visualization and model building are skills that technology instructors have been providing their students for some time. Using visualization and the ability to replicate a model are skills that can be enhanced when students are introduced to communication simulation and the process of developing simulated representations of reality. In this article, the authors explain how to develop and design a communication simulation using a physical security analysis of a computer laboratory as the theme of the activity. Communication simulation from the authors’ viewpoint is the use of technology and visualization to allow the student to communicate by using a model

Computer developed simulations are new teaching tools that faculty are starting to use in their classrooms. In this paper, the authors look at one type of simulation, communication, which can be implemented into the classroom using a physical security analysis from a technology/visualization perspective. However, to disseminate this article to a broader audience and to be consistent with the understanding of the terminology used throughout the narrative several terms will be defined using Wikipedia as the resource. As Clark Aldrich states (2009, p. xxxii), “The lack of common terms is a huge problem, and it has substantially hindered the development of the simulation space. Sponsors, developers, and students have not been able to communicate intelligently.”
Sill Hall 3D Image

Follow The Money

Accountability

Consider managing a grant for several hundreds of thousands of dollars over a period of 24 months whereby the grant outcomes require articulated and cohesive work to be accomplished by a collaborative party of entities. Who is held accountable? The Feds? The local fiduciary whom awarded the grant? Your boss? You? How about your front line staff? What about the local agencies and partners, cohorts and advocates? What components of the grant are clear and what is vague? Is there a contingency plan and systems in place to manage problems and stave off catastrophe?

For a time, common grant language included the phrase, “seamless and transparent services provided to the client”. Ok. But who is really responsible to make sure that happens? Maybe more importantly, who is responsible if the requirements of the grant are not met?
Author: 
Scott Brown

News

$200 Million from DOE Backed Up By $300 Million from Corporations Supporting STEM Education

Many of the country’s largest tech companies, including Amazon, Facebook, Google, Microsoft and Salesforce, pledged a total of $300 million for computer science education, part of a partnership meant to prepare students for careers in technology. The corporate donations follow a White House effort to direct federal money toward teacher training and resources that bolster science, technology, engineering and math. President Trump directed the Education Department to put $200 million in grant money toward computer science education.

Many of the companies involved in the computer science initiative have been pushing to increase computer training in schools. Tech companies see the STEM fields, and computer science in particular, as a weakness in American education and have pressed for coding and other classes to be bolstered to keep the United States competitive with nations that are pulling ahead in those areas.


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The Art of the Future

jim brazell's picture

Why STEM ?

 

"Why should policy makers, educators, school board members and students care about the arts and science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM)?" The Art of the Future is the book written by Jim Brazell in response to this question asked of him by the National School Boards Association (NSBA). Debra Amidon, the creator of the concept of knowledge innovation says in her foreword to the book: “The Art of the Future


News

Manufacturing Day 2017 at Over 2617 locations around the U.S.

Manufacturing Day is a growing grassroots movement of manufacturers dedicated to overcoming the shared challenges facing manufacturers today. The most pressing issue is a gap in skilled labor. 80 percent of manufacturers cannot find the skilled workers they need. This gap continues to widen. Manufacturers’ ability to address this issue has been hindered by the public perception that careers in manufacturing are undesirable and by the lack of sufficient preparatory education. Both of these problems stem from a lack of understanding of present-day manufacturing environments, which are highly technical. Manufacturing environments, which include highly trained, well-paid employees who work on state-of-the-art equipment, are commonly thought of as antiquated factories designed for low-skilled workers. Manufacturing Day addresses this misperception by giving all manufacturers an opportunity to open their doors and show, in a coordinated effort, exactly what manufacturing is.


Skills USA Members Joined by the Secretary of Education in Support of Career and Technical Education

Students representing career and technical education (CTE) programs in 29 states met with congressional representatives Sept. 26 after hearing the Secretary of Education call SkillsUSA “an integral part of their educational experience.” The students were attending the annual Washington Leadership Training Institute (WLTI) to learn to be better advocates for public career education. During the Sept. 23-27 event, they visited their congressional representatives and paid respects at Arlington National Cemetery’s Tomb of the Unknowns as well as the Pentagon 9/11 Memorial. The annual WLTI, with 506 attendees, was the largest in SkillsUSA’s 52-year history.

Skills USA

50,361 Workforce Credentials Issued in Virginia in Fiscal Year 2017

Virginia has achieved the goal set in Executive Order 23 – Establishing the New Virginia Economy Workforce Initiative, which called for the annual production of 50,000 workforce credentials aligned with high-paying jobs in science, technology, engineering, math, and healthcare (STEM-H). The 50,361 STEM-H credentials awarded during fiscal year 2017 represent a 36-percent increase compared to fiscal year 2014 when the goal of 50,000 credentials per year was set. These credentials include: associate degrees, certificate programs, apprenticeships, certifications, licenses, and industry credentials.                   

 

“Because we set an ambitious goal of 50,000 STEM-H credentials each year, Virginia is transforming its workforce into one that is both highly skilled and work-ready for businesses across the Commonwealth,” said Governor Terry McAuliffe.  “These workforce credentials are critical to supporting Virginia’s growing high-tech economy by providing citizens the skills they need to get good-paying jobs. The success of this effort is a testament to the hard work of our educators, students, and business leaders who are strengthening our new Virginia economy every day.”


Robot Proof: Higher Education in the Age of Artificial Intelligence

unveils a framework for universities to train the next generation of creators, rather than laborers, by enhancing skills that are innately, and uniquely, human. The impetus for the book was a realization that robotics and artificial intelligence are advancing more rapidly than anyone predicted. Even scientists appear to be caught off-guard by the sudden and unprecedented capabilities of their creations. These technological advances have vast implications, especially for the future of work.

Northeastern University President and author Joseph E. Aoun said, “Machines are smart and getting smarter,” More jobs are going to disappear and new jobs will be created. We need to meet these challenges.”

http://robot-proof.com/

His plan? Cultivate the best of what it means to be human. Aoun has proposed a new comprehensive curriculum based on a field he calls humanics—the human equivalent of robotics—which is defined by the mastery of three literacies: technological literacy, data literacy, and human literacy—the third referring to qualities computers can’t replicate, no matter how smart they become.

Northeastern University President and author Joseph E. Aoun

Massachusetts CTE Approach Works - Widely Popular With Students

In Massachusetts 48,000 students are enrolled in vocational schools and vocational programs in traditional high schools, with an estimated 3,200 more on waiting lists due to a shortage of available space for those who qualify for acceptance. At Blue Hills Regional Technical School in Canton, which has approximately 850 students in grades 9 through 12, there were 511 applications for just 240 places in the Class of 2021.

What is driving the popularity of vocational education – career and technical education (CTE) – in Massachusetts? How does today’s vocational education differ from that of yesteryear? What is happening in the Bay State on the CTE frontline that is making it so successful and sought after?


IBM Expands New Collar Career Partnerships with U.S. Community Colleges

America’s largest technology employer is expanding partnerships with numerous community colleges in the United States to better prepare more Americans for “New Collar” career opportunities. In these well-paying roles, in-demand technology skills are valued more than credentials, and a traditional four-year college degree may not always be required. In addition to collaborating on curricula design for next generation IT skills, IBM will work with community colleges near its major U.S. facilities to offer more local students the opportunity to participate in internships and apprenticeships within the company, as well as direct hiring for IBM careers. This initiative will grow over the next six months to include more than a dozen schools in or near communities such as Columbia, MO; Rocket Center, WV; Dubuque, IA; Boulder, CO; Poughkeepsie, NY; Raleigh, NC; Austin, TX; Dallas, TX and Houston, TX. With this initiative, IBM is working to expand technology career opportunities in areas that traditionally have been underserved by high-tech employers.

 


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Competitions

Sikorsky Challenges Students to Envision a Helicopter Responsive to 2050 Global Issues

Sikorsky Aircraft, a subsidiary of United Technologies Corp. has launched the 2013 Sikorsky Helicopter 2050 Challenge, a national competition that invites youths ages 9-16 to envision a helicopter capable of addressing global issues likely to be encountered by mid century. Winner of the grand prize — the Igor Sikorsky Youth Innovator Award — will receive a $1,000 scholarship check, meet with Sikorsky rotorcraft engineers, and receive an expenses-paid tour of the BLACK HAWK and SEAHAWK® helicopter assembly lines at Sikorsky’s Stratford, Conn., headquarters.
“We’re challenging kids across the U.S. to think globally about their future and how they can make a difference,” said Judy Bankowski, Vice President and Chief Information Officer at Sikorsky. “This year’s objective is to design a helicopter that can have far-reaching positive impact for our planet and its inhabitants.”


Understanding friction and ball bearings

Grade Level: 
Middle School
Subject: 
STEM, Pre-Engineering, Machine Design
Developed by IEEE as part of TryEngineering 
 
Lesson Synopsis 
The Getting Your Bearings activity explores the concept of friction and shows how ball bearings reduce friction. Students learn about different uses for ball bearings, how the design has changed over time to incorporate roller bearings, test friction using marbles, and identify the use of ball bearings in everyday items.  
 
Lesson Focus
Lesson focuses on the concept of friction and the use of ball bearings to reduce friction.
 
Lesson Objectives 
- Students learn about friction.
- Students learn how incorporating ball bearings in a machine design can reduce friction.
- Students learn about many machines that incorporate ball or roller bearings.
- Students learn about teamwork.
 
Lesson Activities 
 
Students learn about friction and how ball bearings reduce friction and extend the life of machines. Topics examined include friction, ball bearings, engineering design, and problem solving. Students work in teams using marbles to simulate ball bearings.  
 

Foundations

Amgen Foundation - $100 Million for STEM Education

The Amgen Foundation has created a two-pronged approach to inspire the next generation of innovators: (1) investing in and supporting science teachers; and (2) creating hands-on opportunities for students. Amgen of Thousand Oaks, California, advances this work through a suite of STEM Education initiatives such as Amgen Scholars, Amgen Biotech Experience, and Amgen Teach. The Foundation’s total commitment to STEM education is now over $100 million globally. In the communities where Amgen staff lives and works, the company commits millions of dollars in charitable donations, and staff members devote thousands of hours of personal time, to programs and services that can make meaningful differences in people’s lives.


Employment