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Career and Technical Education Equity Act - Update "Perkins Act" Funding Formula

The Career and Technical Education Excellence and Equity Act, will rewrite the Carl D. Perkins Act, which has not been updated since 2006. The bill would support innovation in CTE and redesign the high school experience by creating a grant program to fund partnerships between school districts, employers, and institutions of higher education, with the goal of preparing more students for postsecondary education and the workforce. The bipartisan legislation is sponsored by Senators Mike Enzi (R-WY) and Bob Casey (D-PA) Senators Tim Kaine (D-VA), Rob Portman (R-OH), Tammy Baldwin (D-WI), Shelley Moore Capito (R-WV), and Kelly Ayotte (R-NH) introduced the Career and Technical Education Excellence and Equity Act.


Festo Didactic Acquires Lab-Volt

Festo Didactic, the education division of the Festo Group has acquired Lab-Volt Systems. This is a major Corporate Merger in the Technical Education Sector. For the customers of both companies, this acquisition opens up the availability of a much broader range of products and services worldwide. Lab-Volt’s and Festo Didactic’s product portfolios will be integrated according to a joint portfolio and branding strategy. Festo Didactic, a global education company, is the market leader in technical education with focus on both, learning systems and training services. Lab-Volt is the leading specialist for equipment and solutions in the technical training and continuing education sectors, focusing on electronics, electrical and mechanical engineering, and telecommunications

 


Technology in Action

Economic Facts Everyone Should Know

The following set of facts are called the Ten Pillars of Economic Wisdom. These basic laws of economics were developed by The Economic Foundation of New York. It might be called a guide for human's economic life. These ten rules show how simply the economic truth can be told.


Are You a Winner ?

a Winner says, “Let’s find out”
a loser says, “nobody knows”


when a Winner makes a mistake he says,

“I was wrong”
when a loser makes a mistake he says,

“it wasn't my fault”


a Winner goes through a problem.
a loser goes around it, and never gets past it.
 

a Winner makes commitments.
a loser makes promises.


a Winner says “ I’m good,
but not as good as I ought to be”


a loser says

“I'm not as bad as a lot of other people”


a Winner tries to learn from those who are superior.
a loser tries to tear down those who are superior.


a Winner says “There ought to be a better way”
a loser says “That’s the way its always been done here”


Ioannis Miaoulis- NCTL STEM

We Are the TE in STEM


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Article for Review

Communication Simulation, Understanding and Implementation

Visualization and model building are skills that technology instructors have been providing their students for some time. Using visualization and the ability to replicate a model are skills that can be enhanced when students are introduced to communication simulation and the process of developing simulated representations of reality. In this article, the authors explain how to develop and design a communication simulation using a physical security analysis of a computer laboratory as the theme of the activity. Communication simulation from the authors’ viewpoint is the use of technology and visualization to allow the student to communicate by using a model

Computer developed simulations are new teaching tools that faculty are starting to use in their classrooms. In this paper, the authors look at one type of simulation, communication, which can be implemented into the classroom using a physical security analysis from a technology/visualization perspective. However, to disseminate this article to a broader audience and to be consistent with the understanding of the terminology used throughout the narrative several terms will be defined using Wikipedia as the resource. As Clark Aldrich states (2009, p. xxxii), “The lack of common terms is a huge problem, and it has substantially hindered the development of the simulation space. Sponsors, developers, and students have not been able to communicate intelligently.”
Sill Hall 3D Image

Follow The Money

De-Mystifying Grant Writing

It has been said, “The worst thing about a grant is getting awarded”. Then you have to do everything you said you were going to do. Hopefully, over the years as a grant writer and grant manager I learned a few things. For example, early on I discovered it is better to under-promise and over-deliver. That way the funding agency feels that they really got their money’s worth. Better yet is to align your performance with the client’s expectations. Frequent communication with the client confirms their satisfaction with your performance and provides the Grant Manager with the opportunity to make adjustments if necessary.

RFPs (Request for Proposals) are competitive. There are limited resources designated to accomplish specific goals. I have reviewed grants by my competitors after the release date of the grant awards and have found that grant review teams have little regard for finesse. The Funding Agency recognizes that past performance based on verifiable time-proven experience minimizes the funder’s risk. Funders are interested in having the work get done that accomplishes their mission, on time, to the outcomes, and within the approved budget. 

 

Author: 
Scott Brown

News

Transforming Education for All Learners through Career Technical Education

Putting Learner Success First: A Shared Vision for the Future of CTE is a call to action for leaders, policymakers, employers and practitioners across the nation to commit to creating a high-quality education system where all learners are prepared for a lifetime of future success in high-skill, in-demand careers. Eight organizations release a shared vision for this future of education and CTE. Putting Learner Success First is the result of the Future of CTE Summit, a Fall 2015 convening hosted by partner organizations that brought together national, state and local leaders representing K-12 and postsecondary education, workforce development, business and industry, and the philanthropic community. Together, participants developed a shared understanding of the current CTE landscape, and thought boldly and strategically about how CTE can strengthen and expand its contribution to the transformation of the educational enterprise, so that all learners are successful in the future.


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The Art of the Future

jim brazell's picture

The Future of Ed Tech Markets

FIRST ALLIANCE represents a system of learning connecting experience, simulation, play, design, art, culture, philosophy, inventiveness, and experimentation. The Atlanta GENIUS and other FIRST ALLIANCE competitors are reflecting the future to us today.


News

Leveraging Federal Funds to Support STEM Education

The U.S. Department of Education issued a Dear Colleague Letter to states, school districts, schools and education partners on how to maximize federal funds to support and enhance innovative science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education for all students.

The letter serves as a resource for decreasing the equity and opportunity gaps for historically underserved students in STEM and gives examples of how federal funds—through formula grant programs in the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act—can support efforts to improve instruction and student outcomes in STEM fields.


Career and Technical Education in High School - A Fordham University Study

Fordham’s latest study, by the University of Connecticut's Shaun M. Dougherty, uses data from Arkansas to explore whether students benefit from CTE coursework—and, more specifically, from focused sequences of CTE courses aligned to certain industries. The study also describes the current landscape, including which students are taking CTE courses, how many courses they’re taking, and which ones.

Key findings include: 

  • Students with greater exposure to CTE are more likely to graduate from high school, enroll in a two-year college, be employed, and earn higher wages.
  • CTE is not a path away from college: Students taking more CTE classes are just as likely to pursue a four-year degree as their peers.
  • Students who focus their CTE coursework are more likely to graduate high school by twenty-one percentage points compared to otherwise similar students (and they see a positive impact on other outcomes as well).
  • CTE provides the greatest boost to the kids who need it most—boys, and students from low-income families.

Due to many decades of neglect and stigma against old-school “vo-tech,” high-quality CTE is not a meaningful part of the high school experience of millions of American students. It’s time to change that.

Career and Technical Education in High School

Reskilling America: Learning to Labor in the 21st Century

After decades of off-shoring and downsizing that have left blue collar workers obsolete, the United States is now on the verge of an industrial renaissance. We don't have a skilled labor pool to fill the positions that will be created, which are technically demanding and require specialized skills. A decades-long series of idealistic educational policies with the expressed goal of getting every student to go to college has left a generation of potential workers out of the system. Touted as a progressive, egalitarian institution providing opportunity even to those with the greatest need, the American secondary school system has deepened existing inequalities.

Reskilling America

How Do You Learn Best?

In today’s information-saturated environment, learning is no longer limited to the classroom. With web-based media like television, video games, podcasts, and e-books always at our fingertips, we are learning constantly. Often, we don’t even realize it! However, when faced with the idea of learning for professional development, such as learning how to use new software, often people feel quickly overwhelmed. In the minds of many people, learning “on purpose” is very different than the learning they do while consuming entertainment. Words like “boring”, “difficult” and “frustrating” come to mind. Why is this?

Methods2

Why Choose a College Education over Technical Training? Why Not Both?

Today many adults find themselves excluded from the job market because of inadequate skills, education, and training. The U.S. labor market is increasingly demanding a more educated workforce. According to the National Commission on Adult Literary, adults must have some post-secondary education or occupational skills training to find and hold jobs that will pay family-sustaining wages in the 21st century. Of the 48 million job openings projected for the next five years, 63 percent will require further education past a high school diploma.


The American Council on Education Recommends Manufacturing Skills Courses for College Credit

The American Council on Education (ACE) recently concluded a review of Scientific Management Techniques Manufacturing Skills Training Program and Hands-On Skills Assessment Program.  ACE CREDIT® is recommending college credit for both programs.  ACE CREDIT® is recommending up to 21 college credit hours for Manufacturing Skills Curriculum and up to three credits each for three different skills assessment protocols (Credit for Prior Learning). The programs described are recognized as Best Practice productivity tools by many of the world’s most respected manufacturing organizations. These skill solutions have been taught in training programs of global Fortune 500 manufacturers for many years. These same proven programs are available for the formal education market.


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Competitions

All American Soap Box Derby

Gravity Racing Challenge

With Soap Box Derby cars being used in over 300 schools in 13 states and in classrooms in Singapore, Canada, Germany, New Zealand, and Japan, the International Soap Box Derby continues its mission to develop and provide educational opportunities for K-12 youth worldwide.

Promoting the S.T.E.M. (science, technology, engineering, and math) initiative in education through gravity racing, the Gravity Racing Challenge (GRC) program is designed to provide K-12 educators and students  with  meaningful, project and standards based, intercurricular  learning opportunities. Educators are successfully implementing the GRC program in classrooms,  after-school, summer or enrichment programs and clubs worldwide.


Solar engineering

Grade Level: 
High School
Subject: 
Engineering, STEM

Provided by TryEngineering - http://www.tryengineering.org/lesson_detail.php?lesson=16

 
Lesson Synopsis 
The Here Comes the Sun activity explores the concept of how solar energy is gathered by solar panels and adapted to provide power to a variety of machines, from calculators to spacecraft. Students disassemble a solar powered calculator and explore the component parts. Students work in teams to suggest design enhancements to the calculator to improve performance.  
 
Lesson Focus
Lesson focuses on solar panel design, and its application in the standard calculator. It explores how both solar panels and calculators operate and explores simple circuits using solar power.
 

Foundations

Tuition-Free Community College, The America's College Promise

Forty percent of college students are enrolled at one of America’s more than 1,100 community colleges, which offer students affordable tuition, open admission policies, and convenient locations.  They are particularly important for students who are older, working, need remedial classes, or can only take classes part-time. For many students, they offer academic programs and an affordable route to a four-year college degree. They are also uniquely positioned to partner with employers to create tailored training programs to meet economic needs within their communities such as nursing, health information technology, and advanced manufacturing.

The America’s College Promise proposal would create a new partnership with states to help them waive tuition in high-quality programs for responsible students, while promoting key reforms to help more students complete at least two years of college. Restructuring the community college experience, coupled with free tuition, can lead to gains in student enrollment, persistence, and completion transfer, and employment. Specifically, here is what the initiative will mean:

Employment