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Youth Want Jobs, Not Antiquated Expensive Degrees

Educators of Technical, Technology and STEM education continue with us, to advocate for hands-on skilled training. Thought leaders from around the country have discussed ways to accomplish this through education reform. C. M. Rubin published a discussion with Charles Fadel.

Contemporary education is failing our students because we are stuck in a curriculum designed for a different century, We need to re-examine college entrance requirements (and their tests). They hold change hostage to antiquated and incomplete requirements. Massive adaptation must be demanded by parents and educators alike. Without these changes, we will be unable to adapt curricula to reflect modern needs. It starts with creating a framework for WHAT we need to teach, which must be comprehensive yet concise and actionable


CARBON CAREER & TECHNICAL INSTITUTE - Jim Thorpe, Pennsylvania - Case Study

CHALLENGE: Small, nontraditional learning spaces lacking the right tools for storage, organization, and efficient workflow
SOLUTION: Create a space-saving, well-organized environment for hands-on and classroom learning experiences that mirror real-world shop environments
BENEFITS: Enhanced classroom learning opportunities; significant cost savings from not having to replace lost tools; tools and parts are centralized, easily located, inventoried, and secure; and increased shop/student productivity
PRODUCTS USED: Workstations, Chairs, High-Density Storage Drawer Cabinets
 
Used in automotive shops around the world, Stanley Vidmar storage and workspace solutions are the perfect way for the educators of tomorrow’s automotive technicians and machinists to incorporate professional-grade products into the classroom experience. At Carbon Career & Technical Institute (CCTI), a dedicated team of instructors equips high school students with the skills and knowledge needed to enter the workforce or enroll in a post-secondary educational program. Using real-world examples to teach essential concepts, their staff applies advanced technology to career and technical tasks in areas including welding, precision machine technology, HVAC, and automotive repair.

Technology in Action

Manufacturing in the Future

Manufacturing is one of the most important factors to the economy of a country because it affects the wealth of a country and the standard of living its people enjoy. You only have to look at any number of countries and if they have a strong manufacturing base, they in turn also have a high standard of living. If it were possible to gaze into a crystal ball and look into the future of manufacturing, many amazing things are happening now and will happen in the near future. The use of the Internet will continue to play a major role in how manufacturing is conducted throughout the world. Some of the Web-based technologies such as machine tool control, machine diagnostics online, e-Procurement, e-Manufacturing, Virtual Reality and Simulation, etc., are available now. Investments being made now in new technology will pay huge dividends in product quality, increased productivity, decreased time to market, reduced manufacturing costs in the future.  
Author: 
Steve Krar

Are You a Winner ?

a Winner says, “Let’s find out”
a loser says, “nobody knows”


when a Winner makes a mistake he says,

“I was wrong”
when a loser makes a mistake he says,

“it wasn't my fault”


a Winner goes through a problem.
a loser goes around it, and never gets past it.
 

a Winner makes commitments.
a loser makes promises.


a Winner says “ I’m good,
but not as good as I ought to be”


a loser says

“I'm not as bad as a lot of other people”


a Winner tries to learn from those who are superior.
a loser tries to tear down those who are superior.


a Winner says “There ought to be a better way”
a loser says “That’s the way its always been done here”


Ioannis Miaoulis- NCTL STEM

We Are the TE in STEM


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Article for Review

Communication Simulation, Understanding and Implementation

Visualization and model building are skills that technology instructors have been providing their students for some time. Using visualization and the ability to replicate a model are skills that can be enhanced when students are introduced to communication simulation and the process of developing simulated representations of reality. In this article, the authors explain how to develop and design a communication simulation using a physical security analysis of a computer laboratory as the theme of the activity. Communication simulation from the authors’ viewpoint is the use of technology and visualization to allow the student to communicate by using a model

Computer developed simulations are new teaching tools that faculty are starting to use in their classrooms. In this paper, the authors look at one type of simulation, communication, which can be implemented into the classroom using a physical security analysis from a technology/visualization perspective. However, to disseminate this article to a broader audience and to be consistent with the understanding of the terminology used throughout the narrative several terms will be defined using Wikipedia as the resource. As Clark Aldrich states (2009, p. xxxii), “The lack of common terms is a huge problem, and it has substantially hindered the development of the simulation space. Sponsors, developers, and students have not been able to communicate intelligently.”
Sill Hall 3D Image

Follow The Money

$ 5.2 Million Investment in STEM-based Manufacturing Education Workforce Development Programs

The SME Education Foundation (www.smeef.org) has announced funding to nine model schools in eight states through its PRIME -Partnership Response in Manufacturing Education -Program, for the academic school year, 2012-2013. PRIME, a community-based approach to manufacturing education, is part of a commitment by the SME Education Foundation to address the shortage of manufacturing and technical talent in the United States. Model schools funded by PRIME offer STEM-based curriculum (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) to prepare young people for highly skilled jobs with lucrative potential. One of the richest sources of employment and economic growth will be jobs requiring a solid STEM education.

 

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment in professional, scientific, and technical services is expected to grow by 29 percent, adding 2.1 million new jobs between 2010 and 2020.

 

Author: 
Scott Brown

News

Illinois Tweaks Licensing Requirements for Technical Education Teachers

The Illinois State Board of Education's Division Administrator for Educator Effectiveness, Emily Fox, said the hope is to make it easier for schools to get people with the skills to teach career and technical education into the classroom. "The licensure requirements to get a CTE license did not change. But we did remove the barrier that said that individuals who substitute teach need to hold a bachelors degree," Fox said. "Individuals who are qualified to teach in a career and technical education classroom can sub without having to get a separate substitute license."


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The Art of the Future

jim brazell's picture

Why STEM ?

 

"Why should policy makers, educators, school board members and students care about the arts and science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM)?" The Art of the Future is the book written by Jim Brazell in response to this question asked of him by the National School Boards Association (NSBA). Debra Amidon, the creator of the concept of knowledge innovation says in her foreword to the book: “The Art of the Future


News

Why Pursue a Career in Electronic Systems

Eventually every device that plugs in or has batteries will be part of a huge ecosystem that shares information and control with the other devices.  And we are all part of it. Doesn’t it make sense to be looking at careers that are tied directly to this technology? New challenges come on an almost daily basis as new ideas, technologies, and applications are introduced constantly.  And very few things have as big an impact as providing capabilities they never knew were possible, in a way that is easy to control and enjoy. 

Electronic Systems Professional Alliance

BUILDS ACT - Building U.S. Infrastructure by Leveraging Demands for Skills

Act to ensure that workers are prepared with the skills needed for jobs—in fields such as construction, transportation and energy—that would be created by a major investment in infrastructure. Legislators on both sides of the aisle, have expressed support for a significant infrastructure plan to fix the country’s crumbling roads and bridges.

 

A recent study by the Center of Education and the Workforce at Georgetown University estimated that a $1 trillion infrastructure investment would create 11 million new jobs. Of these jobs, nearly half would require skilled job training beyond a high school level. The BUILDS Act promotes partnerships made up of local businesses and industry organizations, workforce boards, labor representatives and education and training providers to support workforce training programs in infrastructure-related jobs.


Colleges Filling Skills Gap by Including Hands-On Training as Part of Curriculum

Change in Education must start at the University level. The following Institutions of Higher Education are leading the way. The NY Times is covering the story. “The economy and employers have changed,” said Louis Soares, vice president of the American Council on Education. “They want you to come in with a hot skill set, ready to go. Colleges are paying attention at different levels to what that means and trying to develop programs.” 

Some are doing that better than others. “Some institutions are very good,” said Gary Burtless, an economist with the Brookings Institution. “They have their ear to the ground, they’re listening to local employers and paying attention to what they need.”

 

Case Western Reserve University

 

Creating 15- or 18-credit minors may be one of the more effective strategies for preparing students to enter high-demand fields. Because a minor requires fewer credits than a major and few, if any, prerequisites, these allow colleges to be more flexible and responsive to changing industries and emerging technologies.


U.S. Armed Forces, STEM Education and the Skills Gap

The U.S. Armed Forces, including the Army Educational Outreach Program (AEOP), have responded to the gap by leveraging their civilian scientists, engineers and laboratories. The branches host learning sessions and competitions and promote mentorships between students and employees with jobs pertaining to STEM throughout the country.

The AEOP has been supporting STEM education for more than 50 years, according to Louie Lopez, the chief of human capital and STEM outreach at U.S. Army Research, Development Engineering Command. He said the programs leverage the Army’s research laboratories and staff in the hope of instilling STEM literacy in students, and they also hope to introduce students to potential STEM tracks inside and outside of the Army.

FIU Teaches Manufacturing Disciplines to Engineering Students

Among the more than 30,000 students attending renowned Florida International University (FIU) in Miami are some 4,000 young men and women pursuing degrees in various disciplines of engineering.  A required course for the mechanical engineering majors is Manufacturing Processes, located in the University’s Engineering Manufacturing Center, a focal point for Civil, Mechanical, Biomedical, Electrical and Computer Engineering, as well as Engineering Management majors.   It is here that they roll up their sleeves and get into the practical side of advanced manufacturing under the guidance of the Center’s coordinator and instructor Richard Zicarelli.

 

FIU Manufacturing

What are States Doing to Recruit and Retain Employees with Cybersecurity Expertise

The threats and challenges continue to mount. Without an umbrella federal framework, government cyber experts work as best they can and with what they already have to address talent shortages and keep current with new methods of attack. Partnerships are critical in keeping abreast of the latest threats, and a future-looking mindset is necessary to create a pipeline of talent at the state and local level.

Cyberattacks have become more concrete to many of us in recent years. More citizens have received communications from governmental entities or companies about possible illicit access of our personal information—and then there are the allegations of the presidential election being influenced through sharing of hacked information.


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Competitions

Samsung's "SOLVE FOR TOMORROW" STEM Education Contest Awards $40,000 to Fifteen Finalists. Grand Prize Winners to Receive $120,000

When their teacher asked them to take a hard look at issues affecting people in their community, one group of students in Missouri noticed that some of their peers with disabilities had trouble staying upright in their wheelchairs. And so, the students got to work with compressed cardboard, cutting and shaping various components to find which ones would create classroom furniture that would make their friends most comfortable. This is the essence of Samsung’s Solve for Tomorrow contest, which challenges students to tap into their STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) skills to create innovative solutions to problems they observe in their communities. The students in Missouri were recently named one of the 15 national finalists by Samsung Electronics America (SEA).
 


Sports engineering

Grade Level: 
High School
Subject: 
STEM, Pre-Engineering, Design, Aerospace, Golf
 
Lesson Focus
Lesson focuses on how the principles of aerospace engineering have impacted golf ball design, along with equipment used in other sports. Students explore aerospace engineers who have contributed to changing sports, analyze the use of dimples on golf balls, and work as a team of engineers to determine whether adding dimples to airplanes would increase fuel efficiency for the airline industry. They also explore the physics of bounce as it relates to several sports balls.
 
Lesson Synopsis 
The Engineered Sports activity explores the concept of how aerospace engineering has impacted sports, specifically exploring the design of golf balls. Students learn about how industry employs engineering professionals to take products to the next level. They work in teams to explore the physics of bounce, determine the application of aerospace principles to aircraft design, present their plans to the class, and evaluate class recommendations and findings. 

 

Time Needed
One to two 45-minute sessions.
 

Foundations

Tuition-Free Community College, The America's College Promise

Forty percent of college students are enrolled at one of America’s more than 1,100 community colleges, which offer students affordable tuition, open admission policies, and convenient locations.  They are particularly important for students who are older, working, need remedial classes, or can only take classes part-time. For many students, they offer academic programs and an affordable route to a four-year college degree. They are also uniquely positioned to partner with employers to create tailored training programs to meet economic needs within their communities such as nursing, health information technology, and advanced manufacturing.

The America’s College Promise proposal would create a new partnership with states to help them waive tuition in high-quality programs for responsible students, while promoting key reforms to help more students complete at least two years of college. Restructuring the community college experience, coupled with free tuition, can lead to gains in student enrollment, persistence, and completion transfer, and employment. Specifically, here is what the initiative will mean:

Employment