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Youth Want Jobs, Not Antiquated Expensive Degrees

Educators of Technical, Technology and STEM education continue with us, to advocate for hands-on skilled training. Thought leaders from around the country have discussed ways to accomplish this through education reform. C. M. Rubin published a discussion with Charles Fadel.

Contemporary education is failing our students because we are stuck in a curriculum designed for a different century, We need to re-examine college entrance requirements (and their tests). They hold change hostage to antiquated and incomplete requirements. Massive adaptation must be demanded by parents and educators alike. Without these changes, we will be unable to adapt curricula to reflect modern needs. It starts with creating a framework for WHAT we need to teach, which must be comprehensive yet concise and actionable


NEW EDITION OF WELDING SKILLS ADDRESSES INDUSTRY CERTIFICATION

American Technical Publishers announces the availability of new welding training materials specifically designed for welders and students working with all types of welding processes and systems. Welding Skills, Fourth Edition, is an effective instructional tool that addresses all aspects of the welding trade and the latest welding technology. In addition, competencies recommended in the American Welding Society (AWS) Schools Excelling through National Skills Standards Education (SENSE) guidelines are included throughout the textbook.


Technology in Action

Manufacturing in the Future

Manufacturing is one of the most important factors to the economy of a country because it affects the wealth of a country and the standard of living its people enjoy. You only have to look at any number of countries and if they have a strong manufacturing base, they in turn also have a high standard of living. If it were possible to gaze into a crystal ball and look into the future of manufacturing, many amazing things are happening now and will happen in the near future. The use of the Internet will continue to play a major role in how manufacturing is conducted throughout the world. Some of the Web-based technologies such as machine tool control, machine diagnostics online, e-Procurement, e-Manufacturing, Virtual Reality and Simulation, etc., are available now. Investments being made now in new technology will pay huge dividends in product quality, increased productivity, decreased time to market, reduced manufacturing costs in the future.  
Author: 
Steve Krar

Evaluate Cost

Standard practice has been to:

 

EVALUATE THE COST OF
IMPLEMENTING NEW TECHNOLOGY


Survival as a manufacturing nation demands that we also:


EVALUATE THE COST OF NOT
IMPLEMENTING NEW TECHNOLOGY


Ioannis Miaoulis- NCTL STEM

We Are the TE in STEM


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Article for Review

Communication Simulation, Understanding and Implementation

Visualization and model building are skills that technology instructors have been providing their students for some time. Using visualization and the ability to replicate a model are skills that can be enhanced when students are introduced to communication simulation and the process of developing simulated representations of reality. In this article, the authors explain how to develop and design a communication simulation using a physical security analysis of a computer laboratory as the theme of the activity. Communication simulation from the authors’ viewpoint is the use of technology and visualization to allow the student to communicate by using a model

Computer developed simulations are new teaching tools that faculty are starting to use in their classrooms. In this paper, the authors look at one type of simulation, communication, which can be implemented into the classroom using a physical security analysis from a technology/visualization perspective. However, to disseminate this article to a broader audience and to be consistent with the understanding of the terminology used throughout the narrative several terms will be defined using Wikipedia as the resource. As Clark Aldrich states (2009, p. xxxii), “The lack of common terms is a huge problem, and it has substantially hindered the development of the simulation space. Sponsors, developers, and students have not been able to communicate intelligently.”
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Follow The Money

$500 Million in Community College Grants for Training Programs. Click (READ MORE) for State allocations.

$500 million in grants to community colleges and universities around the country for the development and expansion of innovative training programs. The grants are part of the Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training initiative, which promotes skills development and employment opportunities in fields such as advanced manufacturing, transportation and health care, as well as science, technology, engineering and math careers through partnerships between training providers and local employers. The U.S. Department of Labor is implementing and administering the program in coordination with the U.S. Department of Education.

Author: 
Scott Brown

News

Preparing the Workforce to Adapt and Work Collaboratively with Robotic Solutions

Manufacturing in the U.S will build on its current strength by using “technology to empower American potential and ingenuity," according to the Advanced Robotics for Manufacturing (ARM).

The institute, which is a member of Manufacturing USA, a network of regional institutes, looks to robotics to bring about the change. Robotics can “elevate, not eliminate the human roles in manufacturing,” ARM says.

The group’s mission is to help train the future workforce for the high-value careers that will determine the future of manufacturing. And it focuses on lowering the economic, technical, and operational barriers that companies experience in trying to adopt robotic technology.

Advance Robotics for Manufacturing

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The Art of the Future

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Why STEM ?

 

"Why should policy makers, educators, school board members and students care about the arts and science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM)?" The Art of the Future is the book written by Jim Brazell in response to this question asked of him by the National School Boards Association (NSBA). Debra Amidon, the creator of the concept of knowledge innovation says in her foreword to the book: “The Art of the Future


News

High School Programs Join Welding Students with Jobs in Demand

Welding labs at Elgin and Hampshire high schools now are certified testing facilities -- the first in the Midwest and among only three high schools in the country to be accredited.

Both programs are sanctioned by the American Welding Society, allowing students and community members to obtain professional certification meeting industry standards. Courses will be taught by AWS-certified instructors at the high schools.

"There is a huge demand for manufacturing grade, entry-level welders in this area," said Nick Moran, certified welding instructor at Elgin High and technical specialist for Kane County. He will train teachers at both high schools this summer to become certified welding instructors.


Study Finds LECTURERS Still Dominate STEM Education

An analysis of more than 2,000 college classes in science, technology, engineering and math has imparted a lesson that might resonate with many students who sat through them: Enough with the lectures, already.

Published in the journal Science, the largest-ever observational study of undergraduate STEM education monitored nearly 550 faculty as they taught more than 700 courses at 25 institutions across the United States and Canada.

The University of Nebraska-Lincoln’s Marilyne Stains and her colleagues found that 55 percent of STEM classroom interactions consisted mostly of conventional lecturing, a style that prior research has identified as among the least effective at teaching and engaging students.

Lecturer STEM

BMW Investing to Expand its Training in the United States.

BMW seeks to boost the annual number of technicians who graduate from the training centers it owns by around 800, says Denise Melville, department head at BMW Group University. BMW's U.S. dealerships need to add more than 1,500 technicians each year to cover turnover and new positions.

BMW owns training centers at its headquarters in Woodcliff Lake, N.J., and in Ontario, Calif.; Schaumburg, Ill.; Atlanta; Oxnard, Calif. and Spartanburg, S.C.
 
In Atlanta, BMW is building a new campus that will quadruple its training space, Melville says. The new 12,000-square-foot site will have 12 classrooms. The renovated site in Ontario will add 12 classrooms, along with a body and paint shop. BMW also is adding training space at its New Jersey center, and a new building at the Spartanburg training facility.

Community College MakerSpaces Offer Work-Based Learning in California

The CCC Maker Initiative is offering internships and work-based learning experiences for students through 24 California Community College makerspaces, where students gain technical, entrepreneurial and work-ready skills sought by employers.

“Makerspaces are widely recognized now as adaptive labs where learning is contextualized,” said Sierra College Superintendent/President Willy Duncan. “Faculty can offer meaningful projects tied to curriculum and students gain practical skills by interacting with industry partners. In a college makerspace, students practice innovation, develop problem-solving skills and connect to industry partners in cutting-edge fields. It is very motivating for students to see the application of what they have learned in the classroom.”  (https://cccmaker.com/)

Sierra College is serving as the administrator and fiscal agent of the $17 million CCC Maker initiative, which is funded by a grant from the California Community College Chancellors Office, and is focused on developing educational makerspaces within the Doing What MATTERS for Jobs and the Economy (http://doingwhatmatters.cccco.edu/) framework at community colleges throughout the state.

MakerSpaces in California

"What's So Cool About Manufacturing," Contest in Pennsylvania

While there are many initiatives across the country to encourage young students to study STEM subjects and pursue technical careers, one effort does this in a way that pairs learning about manufacturing with developing video production skills. The “What’s So Cool About Manufacturing?” contest is an annual event that allows students from across the state of Pennsylvania to explore different career options in manufacturing by meeting with a local company, and then creating and filming a video that explores that company’s products and services. This opportunity provides the students with experience in planning, scripting, and shooting video content, while at the same time exposes them to what it is like to work in the manufacturing industry, and the different types of career options offered.
 
The contest, which is funded under a 2013 grant from the Pennsylvania Department of Community & Economic Development’s “Discovered in PA, Developed in PA” program, was created by the Manufacturer’s Resource Center (MRC) and provides students and their teachers (who function as coaches) with camera equipment and video production software to use in creating their entries. The contest has expanded to a total of eleven additional states under the Dream It. Do It. brand that was created by the Manufacturing Institute in Washington, DC.
 
What's So Cool About Manufacturing

Business Community Aims to Increase Employer Investment in Workforce Training

“Quality Pathways: Employer Leadership in Earn and Learn Opportunities,” highlights the importance of employer leadership in developing a growing workforce that meets the needs of a modernizing United States economy.
 
“Last year, President Trump charged the business community with finding solutions to help close the skills gap and connect workers with opportunities to develop skills they need to be successful in a 21st century economy,” said U.S. Chamber President and CEO Thomas J. Donohue. “By putting forward this solution, the U.S. business community isn’t sitting on the sidelines – we’re leading the way. Together, we’ve developed a bold solution to improve employer leadership and investment in quality on-the-job learning opportunities. We look forward to implementing this model across the country so today’s students are prepared to be the workers and business leaders of the future.”
 
“Quality Pathways” aims to empower both learners and employers by establishing a business-led recognition system for high-quality earn and learn opportunities based on business best-practices. Creating employer-led earn and learn pathways will also help build stronger connections between employers and their workforce and close the skills gap by connecting job creators with more ready-to-work Americans. To ensure long-term sustainability and success of the system, the paper also calls for an ongoing process to organize businesses across industries.
Quality Pathways

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Competitions

"What's So Cool About Manufacturing," Contest in Pennsylvania

While there are many initiatives across the country to encourage young students to study STEM subjects and pursue technical careers, one effort does this in a way that pairs learning about manufacturing with developing video production skills. The “What’s So Cool About Manufacturing?” contest is an annual event that allows students from across the state of Pennsylvania to explore different career options in manufacturing by meeting with a local company, and then creating and filming a video that explores that company’s products and services. This opportunity provides the students with experience in planning, scripting, and shooting video content, while at the same time exposes them to what it is like to work in the manufacturing industry, and the different types of career options offered.
 
The contest, which is funded under a 2013 grant from the Pennsylvania Department of Community & Economic Development’s “Discovered in PA, Developed in PA” program, was created by the Manufacturer’s Resource Center (MRC) and provides students and their teachers (who function as coaches) with camera equipment and video production software to use in creating their entries. The contest has expanded to a total of eleven additional states under the Dream It. Do It. brand that was created by the Manufacturing Institute in Washington, DC.
 
What's So Cool About Manufacturing

Engineering Air Traffic

Grade Level: 
High School
Subject: 
STEM, Pre-Engineering, Design, Aerospace

Lesson Synopsis

The Engineering Air Traffic lesson explores the engineering and principals behind radar and air traffic control systems. Students explore how radar and computer technology is used to provide critical data in an efficient way to air traffic controllers. Students work as a team of engineers to evaluate a current ATC system, virtually act as traffic controllers, and then develop guidelines to improve the engineered interface between the radar and the human controller. 

 
Lesson Focus
Lesson focuses on the engineering behind air traffic control systems. Teams of students explore principles of radar and how engineered equipment is compiled to provide data to help air traffic controllers keep planes at a safe distance from each other, yet efficiently landing and taking off on schedule. Students work in teams to evaluate data generated for a virtual air traffic system, and determine a plan to bring three planes safely through a
set airspace. They then recommend engineering enhancement to the current system.
 
Time Needed
Two to three 45 minute sessions
 
Lesson Objectives 
Learn about radar. 
Learn about air traffic control technology. 
Learn about systems engineering.
Learn about teamwork.
 

Foundations

Business Community Aims to Increase Employer Investment in Workforce Training

“Quality Pathways: Employer Leadership in Earn and Learn Opportunities,” highlights the importance of employer leadership in developing a growing workforce that meets the needs of a modernizing United States economy.
 
“Last year, President Trump charged the business community with finding solutions to help close the skills gap and connect workers with opportunities to develop skills they need to be successful in a 21st century economy,” said U.S. Chamber President and CEO Thomas J. Donohue. “By putting forward this solution, the U.S. business community isn’t sitting on the sidelines – we’re leading the way. Together, we’ve developed a bold solution to improve employer leadership and investment in quality on-the-job learning opportunities. We look forward to implementing this model across the country so today’s students are prepared to be the workers and business leaders of the future.”
 
“Quality Pathways” aims to empower both learners and employers by establishing a business-led recognition system for high-quality earn and learn opportunities based on business best-practices. Creating employer-led earn and learn pathways will also help build stronger connections between employers and their workforce and close the skills gap by connecting job creators with more ready-to-work Americans. To ensure long-term sustainability and success of the system, the paper also calls for an ongoing process to organize businesses across industries.
Quality Pathways

Employment