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Youth Want Jobs, Not Antiquated Expensive Degrees

Educators of Technical, Technology and STEM education continue with us, to advocate for hands-on skilled training. Thought leaders from around the country have discussed ways to accomplish this through education reform. C. M. Rubin published a discussion with Charles Fadel.

Contemporary education is failing our students because we are stuck in a curriculum designed for a different century, We need to re-examine college entrance requirements (and their tests). They hold change hostage to antiquated and incomplete requirements. Massive adaptation must be demanded by parents and educators alike. Without these changes, we will be unable to adapt curricula to reflect modern needs. It starts with creating a framework for WHAT we need to teach, which must be comprehensive yet concise and actionable


SolidWorks Education Edition Software

The complete CAD teaching tool. Featuring software plus a full curriculum and interactive courseware, SolidWorks® Education Edition is your all-inclusive resource for teaching 3D mechanical CAD, design validation, and data management.


Technology in Action

Economic Facts Everyone Should Know

The following set of facts are called the Ten Pillars of Economic Wisdom. These basic laws of economics were developed by The Economic Foundation of New York. It might be called a guide for human's economic life. These ten rules show how simply the economic truth can be told.


Evaluate Cost

Standard practice has been to:

 

EVALUATE THE COST OF
IMPLEMENTING NEW TECHNOLOGY


Survival as a manufacturing nation demands that we also:


EVALUATE THE COST OF NOT
IMPLEMENTING NEW TECHNOLOGY


Ioannis Miaoulis- NCTL STEM

We Are the TE in STEM


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Article for Review

Communication Simulation, Understanding and Implementation

Visualization and model building are skills that technology instructors have been providing their students for some time. Using visualization and the ability to replicate a model are skills that can be enhanced when students are introduced to communication simulation and the process of developing simulated representations of reality. In this article, the authors explain how to develop and design a communication simulation using a physical security analysis of a computer laboratory as the theme of the activity. Communication simulation from the authors’ viewpoint is the use of technology and visualization to allow the student to communicate by using a model

Computer developed simulations are new teaching tools that faculty are starting to use in their classrooms. In this paper, the authors look at one type of simulation, communication, which can be implemented into the classroom using a physical security analysis from a technology/visualization perspective. However, to disseminate this article to a broader audience and to be consistent with the understanding of the terminology used throughout the narrative several terms will be defined using Wikipedia as the resource. As Clark Aldrich states (2009, p. xxxii), “The lack of common terms is a huge problem, and it has substantially hindered the development of the simulation space. Sponsors, developers, and students have not been able to communicate intelligently.”
Sill Hall 3D Image

Follow The Money

$450 Million Available for Community College and Career Training

The Department of Labor’s (DOL) Employment and Training Administration (ETA) recently announced the availability of some $450 million in grant funds for the Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training (TAACCCT) Grants Program. DOL intends to make grant awards to eligible single institution applicants in all states, as well as to consortia of eligible institutions. The closing date for applications is July 7, 2014, no later than 4 p.m. EST.

Through this fourth and final round of TAACCCT funding, DOL is focused on “advancing innovative, sector-based system change in regional and statewide economies …. These grant projects will create industry-driven strategies that are responsive to regional labor markets and state economies.” The grant program seeks to “increase the number of workers who attain certificates, degrees, and other industry-recognized credentials …” It also aims to “introduce or replicate innovative and effective methods for designing and delivering instruction that address specific industry needs and lead to improved learning, completion, and other outcomes …; and demonstrate improved employment outcomes” to help meet the administration’s “college graduation goal of increasing the percentage of adults with a post-secondary credential by 2020.”

Author: 
Scott Brown

News

Work in the Automation Age: Sustainable Careers Today and Into the Future

80% of manufacturers report a shortage of qualified applicants for skilled production positions, and the shortage could cost U.S. manufacturers 11% of their annual earnings. Manufacturing executives reported an average of 94 days to recruit engineering and research employees and 70 days to recruit skilled production workers. The skills gap is driving up what are already above average wages and benefits in U.S. manufacturing. Studies show an increasing skills gap with as many as two million jobs going unfilled in the manufacturing industry alone in the next decade.

The Association for Advancing Automation (http://www.a3automate.org) (A3) explores the impact of automation on the ever-evolving job market and the growing shortage of skilled employees with experience and training in advanced technologies. A3 examines the types of jobs that are going unfilled and reviews workforce development initiatives, including education, apprenticeships, and on-the-job training that will fill labor shortages and support ongoing economic growth and productivity. http://www.a3automate.org/work-in-the-automation-age-white-paper/

Working in the Automation Age

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The Art of the Future

jim brazell's picture

It Takes a Village to Educate a Child

The economy is the single most important issue for a sizable majority of voters in the 2012 presidential race according to the latest Washington Post-ABC News Poll. Similarly, U.S. competitiveness, entrepreneurship, and innovation are the hot topics in politics and business. On Wednesday, January 18, 2012, Harvard released a survey of approximately 10,000 alumni, from the  Harvard Competitiveness project, indicating American competitiveness will decline over the next three years, according to 71% of those surveyed.

News

Makin' the MAKERSPACE

There is tremendous buzz lately about setting up a makerspace. Thankfully, educators, policy makers (for some reason they are not always one and the same?) administrators and the education community in general are realizing that in order to really cultivate metacognition and real-world skills, we need hands-on, project-based learning. Object-based learning is making a comeback, and teachers are connecting lessons back to the industry, creating a more vocational education. A big part of this movement towards active learning and STEM is creating a makerspace in the classroom.

Gittel Grant

States Want More Career and Technical Training, but Struggle to Find Teachers

Many Minnesota employers say they can’t find skilled workers with the right career training. Meanwhile, high schools are cutting career and technical education courses because they can’t find qualified teachers. “The jobs are there, and we’re not preparing our kids well enough to get into those jobs because the system has not allowed us to,” said Stephen Jones, the superintendent of schools in Little Falls, Minnesota. His district hasn’t had to cancel any courses for lack of instructors, but he says smaller districts in the state have.

Two-thirds of states are currently reporting a shortage of CTE teachers in at least one specialty, according to a Stateline analysis of federal data. Many states, such as Minnesota and South Dakota, have had a shortage of CTE teachers for a decade. Some states, such as Maine, Maryland and New York, have had a shortage for almost 20 years.

A Letter From Students: "Make STEM Education Count"

As juniors in high school, we are concerned about our future. Since we have started high school, we have taken on challenging classes in an effort to prepare ourselves for higher education. We all started taking high school level classes in middle school in preparation to take college classes that we are currently enrolled in as high school students.

Our high school requires more STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) courses to graduate than what Idaho currently requires for graduation. We have spent hours preparing for and taking standardized tests including ISATs, civics exam, biology EOC (End of Course) assessment, and college entrance exams. In addition to all of our academic endeavors, we have all participated in community service activities and extracurriculars. Our class dreams big, and we are not afraid to put forth the extra effort to achieve those dreams.


"Confronting the CTE Stigma" Report from RCU at MSU

“Confronting the CTE Stigma” is a new report developed from statewide surveys conducted by the Research and Curriculum Unit at Mississippi State. Julie Jordan, director of the RCU, said studies indicate that Mississippi students in CTE programs graduate from high school at higher rates than their non-CTE peers. Additionally, CTE prepares students for middle skill-level jobs, “an employment niche where growth is projected to outpace both high- and low-skill occupations.”

In the first phase of the RCU’s study, slightly more than 400 Mississippi adults were interviewed about their attitudes toward CTE. Of that group:

—45 percent were unable to name a single CTE program offered by local schools;

—44 percent said students who were disadvantaged in some way—not college-bound, residing in poverty or having poor grades—would benefit most from CTE participation; and

—48 percent agreed CTE could benefit the college-bound.


Academic Test Mandates Hurt the Need to Train Future Tradesmen

Requiring that high school students spend more hours in classrooms to meet “academic standards” sacrifices, and has clearly impacted, the dire need to give students more opportunities to learn a trade. We’re talking producing more carpenters, welders, plumbers, electricians, masons, mechanics, woodworkers, and other skilled craftsmen.

And while we’re encouraged by state and federal legislation to enhance career and technical education — formerly known as vocational-technical education, or vo-tech — it’s also clear that nothing will change unless the powers-that-be at the state and U.S. Departments of Education accede to the change and stop forcing local school districts to adhere to their “academics first” policies or else.

Lifelong Educational Advantage Program - L.E.A.P.

Made available through Siemens Cooperates with Education, the effort is designed to give high school and technical school graduates a basic-to-advanced machine tool knowledge that will benefit them in their future careers as CNC (Computer Numerical Control) machinists. L.E.A.P. starts with Sinutrain, a PC-based, control-identical training system. This software turns any PC screen into an exact representation of the Sinumerik Operate graphical user interface. The numeric kernel (NC) that drives Sinutrain also powers the Sinumerik 828D and 840D sl controls. Comprehensive knowledge doesn’t require investing in a machine, as all courses can be taught on a PC.


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Competitions

Samsung's "SOLVE FOR TOMORROW" STEM Education Contest Awards $40,000 to Fifteen Finalists. Grand Prize Winners to Receive $120,000

When their teacher asked them to take a hard look at issues affecting people in their community, one group of students in Missouri noticed that some of their peers with disabilities had trouble staying upright in their wheelchairs. And so, the students got to work with compressed cardboard, cutting and shaping various components to find which ones would create classroom furniture that would make their friends most comfortable. This is the essence of Samsung’s Solve for Tomorrow contest, which challenges students to tap into their STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) skills to create innovative solutions to problems they observe in their communities. The students in Missouri were recently named one of the 15 national finalists by Samsung Electronics America (SEA).
 


Solar heating and cooling

Grade Level: 
High School
Subject: 
Environmental Science, Urban planning, Engineering, STEM, Alternative Energy
 
Lesson Synopsis 
The "Solar Structures" lesson explores how the power of the sun can be harnessed to heat and cool a building. Students work in teams of "engineers" to design and build their own solar houses out of everyday items. They test their solar house, evaluate their results, and present to the class.
Lesson Focus
This lesson focuses on how the sun’s energy can be used to heat and cool buildings. Teams of students construct passive solar houses from everyday materials. They then test their solar houses to determine how well they regulate temperature.    
 
Objectives 
- Design and build a passive solar house
- Test and refine their designs
- Communicate their design process and results
 

Foundations

The GM Foundation recognizes the importance of vibrant early education in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM)

General Motors

 
The GM Foundation
 
The General Motors Foundation invests in educational programs and institutions to help nurture tomorrow’s innovators and leaders. The investments are geared primarily towards programs and organizations that help small children enter school with the skills they need to succeed, that contribute to increasing high school graduation rates or that provide much needed financial assistance for college.
 
Chevrolet Green Educator Award
 
The General Motors Foundation is proud to support the Chevrolet GREEN Educator award, given to 10 inspirational educators who engage youth in innovative and interactive environmental learning. Last year, the award recognized educators go above and beyond standard educational practices in the classroom, their school, and their community.
 

Employment