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Proposed ESSA Regulation Supports Well-Rounded Education

In a major step toward implementing the new Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) and providing important clarity for parents, students, and educators about the new law, U.S. Secretary of Education John B. King Jr. announced proposed regulations to implement the law’s accountability, data reporting, and state plan provisions. The regulations would replace the narrow, one-size-fits-all approach that defined ESSA’s predecessor, No Child Left Behind (NCLB), with new flexibility for states and districts; a more holistic approach to measuring a quality education that will help prepare all students for success; and strong protections to ensure the progress of all students. It also reinforces ESSA’s strong commitment to transparency and ensures meaningful engagement and an active role for parents, teachers, students, community leaders, and other stakeholders in implementing the new law. The proposed regulations themselves were informed by extensive input from a diverse group of stakeholders. The Department of Education (Department) participated in well over 100 meetings and events and received hundreds of public comments prior to the release of the regulations. The Department will encourage additional feedback on the proposal from parents, teachers, and other stakeholders through the public comment period, and looks forward to receiving suggestions for improvements to the proposed regulations.


How 3D Printing in Education Improves Learning

With the advent of affordable 3d printers like the DaVinci 1.0 (costs less than $500 in the USA), we wanted to see how this technology can best benefit education. Studica is always looking for ways to help education customers marry new technologies with their teaching goals, to help create a stronger learning experience for students.


Technology in Action

Technology Phobia

All of us suffer from some sort of phobia, be it high places, closed areas, water, etc., and for most of these there is a cure. The phobia affecting many people over the past 40 to 50 years is Technology Phobia, or the uncertainty of how technology would affect their lives and their work.
Let us be honest with ourselves; all of us suffer from technology phobia to some degree or another.

Evaluate Cost

Standard practice has been to:

 

EVALUATE THE COST OF
IMPLEMENTING NEW TECHNOLOGY


Survival as a manufacturing nation demands that we also:


EVALUATE THE COST OF NOT
IMPLEMENTING NEW TECHNOLOGY


Ioannis Miaoulis- NCTL STEM

We Are the TE in STEM


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Article for Review

Communication Simulation, Understanding and Implementation

Visualization and model building are skills that technology instructors have been providing their students for some time. Using visualization and the ability to replicate a model are skills that can be enhanced when students are introduced to communication simulation and the process of developing simulated representations of reality. In this article, the authors explain how to develop and design a communication simulation using a physical security analysis of a computer laboratory as the theme of the activity. Communication simulation from the authors’ viewpoint is the use of technology and visualization to allow the student to communicate by using a model

Computer developed simulations are new teaching tools that faculty are starting to use in their classrooms. In this paper, the authors look at one type of simulation, communication, which can be implemented into the classroom using a physical security analysis from a technology/visualization perspective. However, to disseminate this article to a broader audience and to be consistent with the understanding of the terminology used throughout the narrative several terms will be defined using Wikipedia as the resource. As Clark Aldrich states (2009, p. xxxii), “The lack of common terms is a huge problem, and it has substantially hindered the development of the simulation space. Sponsors, developers, and students have not been able to communicate intelligently.”
Sill Hall 3D Image

Follow The Money

$ 5.2 Million Investment in STEM-based Manufacturing Education Workforce Development Programs

The SME Education Foundation (www.smeef.org) has announced funding to nine model schools in eight states through its PRIME -Partnership Response in Manufacturing Education -Program, for the academic school year, 2012-2013. PRIME, a community-based approach to manufacturing education, is part of a commitment by the SME Education Foundation to address the shortage of manufacturing and technical talent in the United States. Model schools funded by PRIME offer STEM-based curriculum (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) to prepare young people for highly skilled jobs with lucrative potential. One of the richest sources of employment and economic growth will be jobs requiring a solid STEM education.

 

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment in professional, scientific, and technical services is expected to grow by 29 percent, adding 2.1 million new jobs between 2010 and 2020.

 

Author: 
Scott Brown

News

SME Launches High School Membership Program to Build the Manufacturing Workforce Pipeline

"With an anticipated skills gap of 2 million jobs by 2025, the manufacturing industry needs to attract and inspire the next-generation workforce." SME, an organization that trains and develops the manufacturing workforce, has launched a high school membership program to educate the next generation on the value of manufacturing and encourage careers in the field. Manufacturing offers career opportunities for every education level ranging from skilled trades that require a high school diploma or GED to engineers, designers and programmers with bachelor’s and master’s degrees, as well as researchers and scientists with doctorates. There are currently more than 600,000 jobs available in manufacturing, with the expectation that number could grow to 2 million by 2025 because of an aging workforce and new technologies creating more jobs.

“Manufacturing needs to attract the next generation of talent,” said Christopher Wojcik, vice president of SME Membership. “SME is dedicated to educating students on the career opportunities in manufacturing; our high school student membership is a program to help the future workforce better understand the industry and ultimately fill the workforce pipeline.”


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The Art of the Future

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The Future of Ed Tech Markets

FIRST ALLIANCE represents a system of learning connecting experience, simulation, play, design, art, culture, philosophy, inventiveness, and experimentation. The Atlanta GENIUS and other FIRST ALLIANCE competitors are reflecting the future to us today.


News

It's Time to Invest in STEM Education and Build a Nation of Makers

"Congress needs to pass the budget to support the next generation of innovators," says John King Jr., in an article published by U.S. News and World Report. From June 17 through 23, our nation celebrates the National Week of Making. This week recognizes that makers, builders and doers – of all ages and backgrounds – always have had a vital role in pushing our country to develop creative solutions to some of our most pressing challenges.

As President Barack Obama has noted, during this week, "We celebrate the tinkerers and dreamers whose talent and drive have brought new ideas to life, and we recommit to cultivating the next generation of problem solvers."


American Students Want More Hands-on, Real-World Experiences

The Amgen Foundation and Change the Equation (CTEq) today announced results of a survey conducted to better understand what motivates U.S. high school students to study science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). The report, titled “Students on STEM: More Hands-on, Real-World Experiences,” shows that students want additional opportunities that will inspire them to explore careers in scientific fields, and teachers are uniquely positioned to stimulate students’ interest in STEM.

The survey found that large majorities of teenagers like science and understand its value, but common teaching methods, such as teaching straight from the textbook, do not bring the subject matter to life in the same way hands-on, real-life experiences do. Several results reveal an opportunity to better engage students in the classroom. For example:


The Manufacturing Institute and eduFACTOR Partner to Engage Teachers and Students with Cutting Edge Technology

The Manufacturing Institute, the non-profit affiliate of the National Association of Manufacturers, is pleased to announce a new Dream It. Do It. collaboration with Edge Factor’s eduFACTOR. Dream It. Do It. is a national network that works to change the perception of the industry and engage next-generation workers to pursue manufacturing careers. eduFACTOR is a membership-based library of media and interactive resources used by educators to inspire youth.

With this new collaboration of two powerful networks, teachers will have the opportunity to access technology and career pathways videos, CNC and 3D printing projects, event kits, virtual field trips, interactive classroom and STEM activities, CTE training success videos, and other tools to help reach parents and students across the country.

ADVANCE CTE Recognizes Eleven Model Programs of Career Technical Education

Advance CTE's selection committee chose 11 programs for their track records of blending demanding academic work with work-based learning and internships created in partnership with business and community organizations. “CTE should prepare all students for success in both postsecondary education and careers, and these programs of study do exactly that,” said Kimberly Green, Advance CTE Executive Director. “The eleven award winners were chosen, in part, due to their dedication to ensuring access to and supporting success for all students. We hope these programs of study serve as a model for leaders across the country by demonstrating what high-quality CTE looks like and can offer to students and communitiesHere is the list of winners, along with the career cluster each one represents.


Transforming Education for All Learners through Career Technical Education

Putting Learner Success First: A Shared Vision for the Future of CTE is a call to action for leaders, policymakers, employers and practitioners across the nation to commit to creating a high-quality education system where all learners are prepared for a lifetime of future success in high-skill, in-demand careers. Eight organizations release a shared vision for this future of education and CTE. Putting Learner Success First is the result of the Future of CTE Summit, a Fall 2015 convening hosted by partner organizations that brought together national, state and local leaders representing K-12 and postsecondary education, workforce development, business and industry, and the philanthropic community. Together, participants developed a shared understanding of the current CTE landscape, and thought boldly and strategically about how CTE can strengthen and expand its contribution to the transformation of the educational enterprise, so that all learners are successful in the future.


Leveraging Federal Funds to Support STEM Education

The U.S. Department of Education issued a Dear Colleague Letter to states, school districts, schools and education partners on how to maximize federal funds to support and enhance innovative science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education for all students.

The letter serves as a resource for decreasing the equity and opportunity gaps for historically underserved students in STEM and gives examples of how federal funds—through formula grant programs in the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act—can support efforts to improve instruction and student outcomes in STEM fields.


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Competitions

12th Annual eCYBERMISSION Competition

The12th annual eCYBERMISSION, one of several science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) initiatives offered by the Army Educational Outreach Program (AEOP), sponsored by the U.S. Army and administered by the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA), is a free online learning competition designed to cultivate student interest in STEM by encouraging students in grades six through nine to develop solutions to real-world challenges in their local communities. Students can win on a state, regional, and national level, with national winning teams receiving up to $8,000 in U.S.


Keeping cool with insulation

Grade Level: 
High School
Subject: 
STEM, Construction
 
Lesson Synopsis 
The "Keep it Cool" activity explores how engineers have met the challenge of keeping foods, liquids, and other items cool. Students learn about heat transfer, vacuums, and insulation and design a system to keep a cup of chilled water as cool as possible for one hour. Students compare their results with that of other student teams and reflect on the lesson.  
 
Lesson Focus
Lesson focuses on the engineering behind keeping food and other items cool. Students work in teams to develop a system to make an insulated liquid container that will keep chilled water as cool as possible for an hour using everyday items. Students will need to devise a way to have a thermometer rest in the water and be able to read the temperature throughout the hour. They plan their design, execute and test their system and share their experiences with the class.
 
Lesson Activities 
Students explore how engineers have developed systems to keep liquids cool and learn about heat transfer, insulation, and vacuums. They work in a team to develop a system to keep a cup of chilled water as cool as possible for one hour using everyday materials, share and test their designs with the class and reflect on the experience.
 

Foundations

The International Technology and Engineering Educators Association (ITEEA, formerly ITEA)

The International Technology and Engineering Educators Association (ITEEA) is the professional organization for technology, innovation, design, and engineering educators.  Our mission is to promote technological literacy for all by supporting the teaching of technology and engineering and promoting the professionalism of th


Employment