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CareerTech Vision 2014 - Association for Career and Technical Education

The biggest and best event of the year for the Technical Educator is taking place this week in Nashville Tennessee, at the Opryland Hotel and Conference Center. CareerTech Vision 2014, the Annual Conference hosted by the Association for Career and Technical Education has been convened for over eighty years. http://careertechvision.com/ Educators, administrators, researchers, guidance counselors and others involved in planning and conducting CTE programs at the secondary, postsecondary and adult levels are getting together to share new ideas and best practices that will help them be prepared for their greatest challenges—all while connecting to inspirational general keynote speakers, didactic idea labs, the latest technologies, hands-on workshops, powerful business connections at the CareerTech Expo and much more.

SolidWorks Education Edition Software

The complete CAD teaching tool. Featuring software plus a full curriculum and interactive courseware, SolidWorks® Education Edition is your all-inclusive resource for teaching 3D mechanical CAD, design validation, and data management.


Technology in Action

Manufacturing in the Future

Manufacturing is one of the most important factors to the economy of a country because it affects the wealth of a country and the standard of living its people enjoy. You only have to look at any number of countries and if they have a strong manufacturing base, they in turn also have a high standard of living. If it were possible to gaze into a crystal ball and look into the future of manufacturing, many amazing things are happening now and will happen in the near future. The use of the Internet will continue to play a major role in how manufacturing is conducted throughout the world. Some of the Web-based technologies such as machine tool control, machine diagnostics online, e-Procurement, e-Manufacturing, Virtual Reality and Simulation, etc., are available now. Investments being made now in new technology will pay huge dividends in product quality, increased productivity, decreased time to market, reduced manufacturing costs in the future.  
Author: 
Steve Krar

A Brighter Tomorrow

How often we wish for another chance

To make a fresh beginning,

A chance to blot our mistakes

And change failure into winning--

And it does not take a new year

To make a brand-new start,

It only takes the deep desire

To try with all our heart

To live a little better

And to always be forgiving

And to add a little laughter

To the world in which we're living--

So never give up in despair

And think that you are through,

For there's always a tomorrow

And a chance to start anew.

Anonymous


Ioannis Miaoulis- NCTL STEM

We Are the TE in STEM


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Article for Review

Communication Simulation, Understanding and Implementation

Visualization and model building are skills that technology instructors have been providing their students for some time. Using visualization and the ability to replicate a model are skills that can be enhanced when students are introduced to communication simulation and the process of developing simulated representations of reality. In this article, the authors explain how to develop and design a communication simulation using a physical security analysis of a computer laboratory as the theme of the activity. Communication simulation from the authors’ viewpoint is the use of technology and visualization to allow the student to communicate by using a model

Computer developed simulations are new teaching tools that faculty are starting to use in their classrooms. In this paper, the authors look at one type of simulation, communication, which can be implemented into the classroom using a physical security analysis from a technology/visualization perspective. However, to disseminate this article to a broader audience and to be consistent with the understanding of the terminology used throughout the narrative several terms will be defined using Wikipedia as the resource. As Clark Aldrich states (2009, p. xxxii), “The lack of common terms is a huge problem, and it has substantially hindered the development of the simulation space. Sponsors, developers, and students have not been able to communicate intelligently.”
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Follow The Money

U.S. Department of Education - Investing in Innovation (i3) Grant Competition

The U.S. Department of Education announced the start of the $134 million 2014 Investing in Innovation (i3) grant competition on March 14th, 2014 with the release of the program's invitation for pre-applications for the i3 "Development" grants (up to $3,000,000 each). In its fifth round of competition, the i3 program continues to develop and expand practices that accelerate student achievement and prepare every student to succeed in college and in their careers. The i3 program includes three grant categories: Development, Validation and Scale-up. The Department plans to announce applications for the Validation and Scale-up categories this spring.

Author: 
Scott Brown

News

Corona High School - Best Practices in STEM Education

Eric Lee has been teaching Design Manufacturing Technology to his students at Corona High School for over twenty years. With a background in plastics and metalworking, he incorporated his passion for creativity into the curriculum and developed a program that has encouraged and delighted students from inquisitive freshmen to career-bent seniors. When he began at Corona, the technology course was only a few years old and depended on one CNC lathe and one CNC mill running off antiquated DOS software to bring students’ projects from design to manufacture.

 

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The Art of the Future

jim brazell's picture

It Takes a Village to Educate a Child

The economy is the single most important issue for a sizable majority of voters in the 2012 presidential race according to the latest Washington Post-ABC News Poll. Similarly, U.S. competitiveness, entrepreneurship, and innovation are the hot topics in politics and business. On Wednesday, January 18, 2012, Harvard released a survey of approximately 10,000 alumni, from the  Harvard Competitiveness project, indicating American competitiveness will decline over the next three years, according to 71% of those surveyed.

News

Wheeling High School - Learning Manufacturing Skills

Javier Tamayo works at Bridgestone right out of high school, after learning many of his skills at Wheeling High School's innovative manufacturing program, Tamayo, 19, landed the $12-an-hour job last year, and is on his way to a career that pays upwards of $80,000 a year. Wheeling (IL) has been turning out hire-ready manufacturing workers like Tamayo for six years. It's one of a growing number of U.S. high schools that have launched or revived manufacturing programs in recent years to guide students toward good-paying jobs and help fill a critical shortage of skilled machinists, welders and maintenance technicians.


Energy Industry 3 Million Jobs by 2020

The number of jobs in the Energy Sector will double in the next five years, according to a recent report by Manpower, the worldwide staffing company. More than half of energy employers say they are having great difficulties finding “the talent it needs.” 74 percent say the problem will get worse by 2020. The report summarizes, 'This skills gap could adversely affect our nation’s competitiveness and hurt the record-setting growth seen in the energy and manufacturing sectors unless immediate steps are taken to better educate young Americans in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM).


Digging Deeper in STEM Education

In the context of competitiveness and immigration policy, STEM jobs and education are big issues. But what do we actually mean when we’re talking about STEM? Obviously, science, technology, engineering and math. "The approach to STEM education needs to be more targeted," suggests Patrick Gusman, At a panel discussion hosted by the Internet Innovation Alliance and Pew Research Center. "Instead of investing in STEM education because it’s a “great buzzword,” there needs to be an examination of what the currently relevant skills are and “re-tooling” school, after-school and community programs accordingly.


Carnegie Science Center announces results of STEM Education Study

“In our work at the Science Center, we consistently hear concerns from corporate leaders about having a qualified workforce for the future. Corporations need collaborative problem-solvers with excellent skills in science, technology, engineering, and math – or STEM,” said Ron Baillie, the Henry Buhl, Jr., Co-Director of Carnegie Science Center. “We launched our Chevron Center for STEM Education and Career Development  three years ago to address this issue, embracing our role as convener of all stakeholders in the quest for top-quality STEM education – corporations, parents, educators, students, legislators, foundations -- as we inspire and prepare young people to meet the needs of our region and our nation. ”


The Creating Quality Technical Educators Act of 2014

The Senate Career and Technical Education (CTE) Caucus, introduced the Creating Quality Technical Educators Act that would create a CTE teacher-training grant partnership to recruit and train high-quality CTE teachers. The Creating Quality Technical Educators Act grant would foster partnerships between high-needs secondary schools and post-secondary institutions to create one-year teacher residencies for CTE teachers. Through grants in the Higher Education and Opportunity Act of 2008 (HEOA), many teacher residency partnerships already exist between post-secondary institutions and local schools to train prospective educators, but none are CTE focused.

CTE teacher residencies created through the Creating Quality Technical Educators Act would target mid-career professionals in related technical fields, as well as recent college graduates, veterans or currently licensed teachers with a desire to transition to a CTE focus.

Industry Solutions for Attracting Future U.S. Manufacturing Employees

The reality is manufacturing continues to evolve with other industries. Many of today’s workers have tech-savvy jobs that ask them to use software in ways involving modeling products with 3D visualization tools, mining big data with analytics, and automating assembly with robotics. From procurement to design, building, delivery, and service, there’s considerable opportunity–not to mention massive room for growth–at some of the world’s largest companies.

Something has to be done, Resurging interest in manufacturing as a career will require a systemic effort, both publicly and privately. It’s going to have to be approached from the ground up, and we’ve come up with a list that will help attract the younger workforce to manufacturing.  Adam Robinson of Cerasis is our industry expert recommending the following solutions.

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Competitions

F1 in Schools

F1 in Schools is a multi-disciplinary challenge in which teams of students aged 9 to 19 deploy CAD/CAM software to collaborate, design, analyse, manufacture, test, and then race miniature gas powered balsa wood F1 cars.

  • F1 in Schools is the only global multi-disciplinary STEM challenge for students aged 9 to 19.
  • It is a unique global platform for the promotion of Formula One and partners to a youth market.
  • Teams must raise sponsorship and manage budgets to fund  research, travel and accommodation.
  • The challenge inspires students to use IT to learn about physics, aerodynamics, design, manufacture, branding, graphics, sponsorship, marketing, leadership/teamwork, media skills and financial strategy, and apply them in a practical, imaginative, competitive and exciting way.
  • The founding constitution of F1 in Schools stipulates that it is, and shall remain, a not-for-profit organisation.  Funds raised through sponsorship are invested in administering, developing and expanding the challenge. All income is deployed in accordance with guidelines laid down by Formula One Management.

Barcodes - changing shopping with engineering

Grade Level: 
Post Secondary
Subject: 
STEM, Pre-Engineering
 
Lesson Focus
Lesson focuses on how computerized barcodes have improved efficiency in product distribution; explores the barcoding process and engineering design.
 
Lesson Synopsis 
The Cracking the Code activity explores the concept of how computerized barcoding has simplified distributing and pricing of products. Students learn about encoding and decoding, the barcoding system, and how a mathematical formula is embedded in
barcoding to safeguard against errors. Students use websites to identify product barcodes, test codes from everyday product, and work as an "engineering team" to come up with the next generation of information embedding systems.  
 
Time Needed
One to two 45 minute sessions.
 
Lesson Objectives 
- Students learn about encoding systems -- specifically barcodes -- and decoding technology.
- Students learn about how barcodes interface with computer systems.
- Students learn about how barcodes have improved efficiency in distribution of manufactured products.
- Students learn how the development of barcodes has impacted everyday life.
- Students learn about teamwork and problem solving in groups.
 
 

Foundations

Manufacturing Institute Announces M-List of Schools Teaching NAM-Endorsed Skills

The Manufacturing Institute, an affiliate of the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM), has unveiled a charter set of schools that are teaching their students industry-validated manufacturing skills under the organization’s Manufacturing Skills Certification System.

The schools on the M-List have arranged their coursework around industry standards as part of their manufacturing education programs, enabling students to earn credentials that are in the NAM-endorsed system. The system is designed to standardize skills in 14 manufacturing areas, including machining and welding. Those who possess the credentials can carry them across the country, giving manufacturing employers nationwide assurance that they have the necessary production skills for employment.

Employment