Home

Thomas Shaw's picture

Youth Want Jobs, Not Antiquated Expensive Degrees

Educators of Technical, Technology and STEM education continue with us, to advocate for hands-on skilled training. Thought leaders from around the country have discussed ways to accomplish this through education reform. C. M. Rubin published a discussion with Charles Fadel.

Contemporary education is failing our students because we are stuck in a curriculum designed for a different century, We need to re-examine college entrance requirements (and their tests). They hold change hostage to antiquated and incomplete requirements. Massive adaptation must be demanded by parents and educators alike. Without these changes, we will be unable to adapt curricula to reflect modern needs. It starts with creating a framework for WHAT we need to teach, which must be comprehensive yet concise and actionable


ShopBot Announces "Digital Fab Tools for Schools"

ShopBot Tools, a respected leader in digital design and fabrication tools, has launched "Digital Fab Tools for Schools," a special promotion supporting the wider availability of digital fabrication technology and curricula in high schools and middle schools in collaboration with Autodesk, Inc. Using digital fabrication tools helps teachers incorporate hands-on "making" to successfully teach STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) and other subjects.

With the generous support of Autodesk, a leader in cloud-based design and engineering software, this ShopBot promotion will provide interested teachers and educators with a voucher worth $2,500 toward the purchase of a limited number of ShopBot Desktop CNC tools, together with ShopBot’s training and support, and a free* copy of Autodesk123D Design software. The Autodesk 123D Design software is a 3D modeling tool that allows users to create a digital model and then 3D print or fabricate their idea.
 


Technology in Action

Manufacturing in the Future

Manufacturing is one of the most important factors to the economy of a country because it affects the wealth of a country and the standard of living its people enjoy. You only have to look at any number of countries and if they have a strong manufacturing base, they in turn also have a high standard of living. If it were possible to gaze into a crystal ball and look into the future of manufacturing, many amazing things are happening now and will happen in the near future. The use of the Internet will continue to play a major role in how manufacturing is conducted throughout the world. Some of the Web-based technologies such as machine tool control, machine diagnostics online, e-Procurement, e-Manufacturing, Virtual Reality and Simulation, etc., are available now. Investments being made now in new technology will pay huge dividends in product quality, increased productivity, decreased time to market, reduced manufacturing costs in the future.  
Author: 
Steve Krar

Evaluate Cost

Standard practice has been to:

 

EVALUATE THE COST OF
IMPLEMENTING NEW TECHNOLOGY


Survival as a manufacturing nation demands that we also:


EVALUATE THE COST OF NOT
IMPLEMENTING NEW TECHNOLOGY


Ioannis Miaoulis- NCTL STEM

We Are the TE in STEM


Click Your State For Local Information

Article for Review

Communication Simulation, Understanding and Implementation

Visualization and model building are skills that technology instructors have been providing their students for some time. Using visualization and the ability to replicate a model are skills that can be enhanced when students are introduced to communication simulation and the process of developing simulated representations of reality. In this article, the authors explain how to develop and design a communication simulation using a physical security analysis of a computer laboratory as the theme of the activity. Communication simulation from the authors’ viewpoint is the use of technology and visualization to allow the student to communicate by using a model

Computer developed simulations are new teaching tools that faculty are starting to use in their classrooms. In this paper, the authors look at one type of simulation, communication, which can be implemented into the classroom using a physical security analysis from a technology/visualization perspective. However, to disseminate this article to a broader audience and to be consistent with the understanding of the terminology used throughout the narrative several terms will be defined using Wikipedia as the resource. As Clark Aldrich states (2009, p. xxxii), “The lack of common terms is a huge problem, and it has substantially hindered the development of the simulation space. Sponsors, developers, and students have not been able to communicate intelligently.”
Sill Hall 3D Image

Follow The Money

National Education Foundation Launches STEM Grant Program

In order to improve the critical STEM education in the nation’s K-12 schools, National Education Foundation (NEF), the national non-profit leader in bridging the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) divides, has launched a multimillion dollar grant program in partnership with TEKSystems and Pearson.

Any school district/school with 35% or more students on Free/Reduced cost lunch is eligible. Apply at http://www.cyberlearning.org/adoptgrant. NEF will award 100 grants in 2013-14 school year, with at least one in each state.

Author: 
Scott Brown

News

Preparing Our Workforce Nation With New Skills for Automation

“How do we reposition our workforce to remain competitive? The answer lies in retraining the workforce nation to excel in automation and technology in the 21st century marketplace. Think about that for a moment… what has happened to work in the past few decades. Many in the workforce were raised with the ‘jobs for life’ philosophy of the 1950’s, 60’s and 70’s. These positions required no postsecondary education, no specialized training, or certification, just a high school diploma. Those days are gone forever.

Then reality hit in the 80’s and 90’s, with automation and technology. In the manufacturing sector, many jobs that were traditionally performed by people are now automated, with machines replacing factory workers. This evolution is not just limited to the manufacturing industry. All industries have been affected by “automation” and “technology”. As I sit writing this article in Panera Bread on Long Island, NY I can order my food at a kiosk. McDonald just unveiled their touch screen self-service kiosk at various locations throughout the U.S. These kiosks will replace some cash register positions. Recently, Amazon announced plans to use automation to displace cashiers. They plan to open a futuristic grocery store eliminating the human element.
Dr. Corinthia Price

Syndicate content

The Art of the Future

jim brazell's picture

The Future of Ed Tech Markets

FIRST ALLIANCE represents a system of learning connecting experience, simulation, play, design, art, culture, philosophy, inventiveness, and experimentation. The Atlanta GENIUS and other FIRST ALLIANCE competitors are reflecting the future to us today.


News

IBM CEO Wants to Help Trump Create New Jobs in America

Rometty urged Trump in a letter to focus his job-creation efforts on vocational training for young workers.

"Let's work together to scale up this approach of vocational training, creating a national corps of skilled workers trained to take the 'new collar' IT jobs that are in demand here in America," Rometty wrote in the letter that was first reported by CNBC.

 

Trump too has advocated for more job training, something he and President Obama seem to agree on.

Obama has spent a record $265 million on apprenticeship programs in the last two fiscal years, according to the Commerce Department.

 


The U.S Should Ensure Students Can Train for STEM Careers

In order for the US to remain at the forefront of innovation and not lag behind, we must address the disconnect between the skills required for 21st century jobs and young people’s ability to acquire those skills. Fixing this will require us to evolve our approach to public education and training. The latest results of the PISA exam, which assesses science, math, and reading performance among 15-year-olds around the globe, show American students noticeably behind in math scores (below the international average), with science and reading scores remaining flat. This is not a small problem.

In one way, Congress took a bold, bipartisan step toward reversing this downward trend and closing America’s skills gap last fall, when the House of Representatives voted 405-to-5 to reauthorize the Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Technical Education Act, which had languished since 2006. The Perkins Act provides more than $1 billion in funding for career and technical education across the US. The bill aligns career and tech education programs with actual labor market demands. Updating this important legislation can and should be an early win for the 115th Congress and the incoming administration.

Virtual and Augmented Reality Learning Experience - DOE Launches $680,000 Challenge

Simulated environments, such as virtual and augmented reality, 3D simulations, and multiplayer video games, are emerging approaches to deliver educational content. Research indicates that simulation-based learning provides students with enriched experiences in information retention, engagement, skills acquisition, and learning outcomes.The EdSim Challenge seeks next-generation educational simulations that strengthen academic, technical, and employability skills. The Department is most interested in immersive and engaging simulations that include clearly defined learning goals and build diverse skill sets.The purpose of this Challenge is to stimulate the marketplace for computer-generated virtual and augmented reality educational experiences that combine existing and future technologies with skill-building content and embedded assessment. The developer community is encouraged to make aspects of simulations available through open source licenses and low-cost shareable components.


Coding to Every Classroom

The push to teach coding in U.S. schools has been growing: Thanks to initiatives like the White House’s CS for All program, computer science is now recognized as a core skill for today’s students. A new study by Gallup and Google revealed that 90 percent of parents want their child to learn CS, yet only 40 percent of K-12 school districts offer some kind of CS course. Teacher recruitment and training efforts are beginning to solve the problem at the high-school level, but in K-8 schools (where very few schools offer CS and many teachers are generalists) the challenges are different. Many teachers without much coding experience understandably feel anxious about integrating this new literacy into their classrooms.

Coding to Every Classroom

Students are a (Plasma) Cut Above with CAD/CAM

The students in Dale Sunderman’s shop classes at Oregon’s Stayton High School are so busy cutting, pressing, milling and welding unique projects they wish there were more hours in a school day. The courses begin with Manufacturing 1 and include the basics in shop safety, sheet metal work, drill press, lathe and mill operations and automated manufacturing. Here, the students get their feet wet in CAD (Computer Aided Design) and CAM (Computer Aided Machining) operations. After a basic fabrication class, students enter Advanced Manufacturing, where they hone their skills in MIG and TIG welding, as well as industry-oriented CNC programming and machining. “It is at this level and in the Independent Studies Manufacturing course,” says Sunderman, “that the more eager students really begin to stand out. Their projects even capture the interest of the surrounding community.”
 
Stayton HS, MasterCAM

Makerspaces: Simple and Cost Effective Projects to Build Your Own STEM Program

Every new classroom project must satisfy available resources within three dimensions: 1) time, 2) money and 3) physical space. The 2016 New Media Consortium Horizon Report for K-12 Education anticipates that makerspaces will be highly adopted in schools across the country within the next year. Maker education and makerspaces are the hot topic in STEM education right now.

Over the last year I have worked with many teachers in a professional development environment who are simultaneously enthusiastic about the idea of a makerspace, and frustrated by the limitations of space in their schedule, budget and classroom layout. We all want a makerspace, but how do we make that happen within these constraints?
Ready for the Good News?
You do not need wait for additional funding or a district-wide initiative to build your own classroom makerspace. Teachers can embrace makerspaces with any level of experience and with any available resources.

Syndicate content

Competitions

Sikorsky Challenges Students to Envision a Helicopter Responsive to 2050 Global Issues

Sikorsky Aircraft, a subsidiary of United Technologies Corp. has launched the 2013 Sikorsky Helicopter 2050 Challenge, a national competition that invites youths ages 9-16 to envision a helicopter capable of addressing global issues likely to be encountered by mid century. Winner of the grand prize — the Igor Sikorsky Youth Innovator Award — will receive a $1,000 scholarship check, meet with Sikorsky rotorcraft engineers, and receive an expenses-paid tour of the BLACK HAWK and SEAHAWK® helicopter assembly lines at Sikorsky’s Stratford, Conn., headquarters.
“We’re challenging kids across the U.S. to think globally about their future and how they can make a difference,” said Judy Bankowski, Vice President and Chief Information Officer at Sikorsky. “This year’s objective is to design a helicopter that can have far-reaching positive impact for our planet and its inhabitants.”


Engineering Air Traffic

Grade Level: 
High School
Subject: 
STEM, Pre-Engineering, Design, Aerospace

Lesson Synopsis

The Engineering Air Traffic lesson explores the engineering and principals behind radar and air traffic control systems. Students explore how radar and computer technology is used to provide critical data in an efficient way to air traffic controllers. Students work as a team of engineers to evaluate a current ATC system, virtually act as traffic controllers, and then develop guidelines to improve the engineered interface between the radar and the human controller. 

 
Lesson Focus
Lesson focuses on the engineering behind air traffic control systems. Teams of students explore principles of radar and how engineered equipment is compiled to provide data to help air traffic controllers keep planes at a safe distance from each other, yet efficiently landing and taking off on schedule. Students work in teams to evaluate data generated for a virtual air traffic system, and determine a plan to bring three planes safely through a
set airspace. They then recommend engineering enhancement to the current system.
 
Time Needed
Two to three 45 minute sessions
 
Lesson Objectives 
Learn about radar. 
Learn about air traffic control technology. 
Learn about systems engineering.
Learn about teamwork.
 

Foundations

Connecting Secondary CTE and Apprenticeship Programs - The National Career Technical Education Foundation

The National Career Technical Education Foundation (NCTEF) is excited to announce a new effort to strengthen the alignment between Career Technical Education (CTE) and apprenticeship programs.

Over the next year, NCTEF, funded through a contract with the U.S. Department of Education Office of Career, Technical and Adult Education (OCTAE), will be leading an effort to identify model CTE programs of study that align with and articulate to apprenticeship programs in a variety of contexts and Career Clusters. The project’s goal is to strengthen the pipeline into apprenticeship programs and spark innovation in the field.
Through The Potential Role of Secondary Career and Technical Education Programs in Preparing Students for Apprenticeship Programs, NCTEF and its partners, RTI International, Jobs for the Future, Vivayic and Quality Information Partners, will conduct site visits of model programs across the country to inform the development of a range of resources and technical assistance tools.

Employment